Most motorcycle problems are caused by the nut that connects the handlebars to the saddle.

Bar Muffs

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commuterman
Scratcher!
Scratcher!

Posts : 20
Location : Saarf East England

Bar Muffs

Post by commuterman on Sun 04 Sep 2011, 4:20 pm

Looking to fit bar muffs for the winter, Oxford look good and have several types. I've never used them before and have heard mixed reviews about interference with controls. Anyone got any experience of Oxford ones, or in general? (Was tempted to put muffs in general but asking for trouble there..Shocked )
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LI
Two Tone
Two Tone

Posts : 125
Location : North East

Re: Bar Muffs

Post by LI on Mon 05 Sep 2011, 10:48 am

I had some. First issue was that you had to cut a hole in them to fit the mirror bar through. Not easy to do neatly without foam leaking out over time. Then I found that they caught on the levers and you really don't want them holding your clutch in... They're also not easy to get your hand in and out of quickly while moving (say to clean your visor or switch to reserve). Finally, they really look nasty when on.

I think a good quality pair of winter gloves are probably a better buy to my mind.
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Chris_B
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Posts : 23
Location : Dorset

Re: Bar Muffs

Post by Chris_B on Sat 10 Mar 2012, 9:26 pm

I ride year round and fitted bar muffs on two different bikes (Sym 125 and CB500) for the winter months and find them absolutely brilliant. They're Oxford ones and did take some getting used to.

On the odd occasion the horn would sound when getting to the grip, and once or twice the start button would ping, but once I got used to sliding my hand to the bar from filler cap distance away at grip level, it was smooth and no movement made to the muffs. I did find that the ones I had looked big, but still seemd to leave the light switch and indicator switch exposed which meant I needed to get my thumbs through the opening to them. Again, took some getting used to, but once done I wouldn't ride in the winter without them. I've since fitted Oxford Hot Hands and thought I wouldn't need the muffs, but the wind on the top part made the hot hands not as effective so ran with both this last winter and even with minus temps, never needed to rub the engine to get the feel back.

As for putting the hole in for the mirrors, I fitted the muffs , sat on the bike and kept sticking my hands in and out until they seemed settled, then felt from the top of the muff to where the mirror mounts were and marked them. Then hands in and out again and checked again to see if mirror mounts were roughly where I had marked. Once happy, cut the small plus mark as per directions and worked the mirror stud throught to the mount. I kept the plus mark cut to a size just smaller then the mirror post, so any sign of the cut was hardly visible. This seemed to work as I didn't see any of the foam come out. It did however want to turn a little when I tightened up the locking nut for mirror, so had to try and ease the fabric of the muffs to stay in place to get final adjustment.

Cheers
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commuterman
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Posts : 20
Location : Saarf East England

Re: Bar Muffs

Post by commuterman on Sun 11 Mar 2012, 5:38 pm

Used them through the winter months reckon the weather's changed for good now so took them off today. My experience was pretty much as you chaps. The right one fitted really well as it was tight around the brake fluid reservoir but the left one was a bit of a pain to be honest. Over about 70mph it flapped about if I had to take my hand out, main beam came on & all sorts, struggled to use the indicator switch and also had the 'horn going off thing' which no doubt pleased my neighbours at 5am when I was leaving for work! Having said that, they worked a treat keeping my hands warm & dry, didn't feel a thing so worth the minor aggravation I reckon. Looked at fitting the left one through the mirror stem but couldn't quite get it to fit properly.

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Re: Bar Muffs

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