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laying a bike up (storing outside)

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trevor machine
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laying a bike up (storing outside)

Post by trevor machine on Thu 21 Sep 2017, 4:15 pm

Might be laying one of my cb5s up - haven't the garage or shed space though, so may have to go into hibernation outside. Probably tarp it - which will protect it from the worst of the weather (also, I actually believe the bike will be better off outside as it will be less likely to be attacked by mice - a real problem apparently, when stored in more insulated, drier places). But what other steps should be taken?

Here are some I'm considering - please add any others and/or offer alternative advice for those I've listed:

i). Drain tank - or brim it? I favour the latter - it seems that this means the tank is less likely to corrode, if it's full of fuel. But then what about all this ethanol in petrol? Doesn't that create its own problems? Perhaps the addition of some fuel stabiliser would help counteract any issues that may otherwise be associated with keeping the tank full of petrol.


ii). Drain the carbs - don't want to leave them full of this dodgy new petrol, which can gum up needles and springs etc. etc. Perhaps go one further than this. Drain the tank completely, drain the cabs dry, then put some Red X into the tank and fill the carb bowls with that and leave them that way. Just a thought.


iii). Some sort of preserver applied to various surfaces - ACF50, WaxOyl, old-fashioned grease. I'm a fan of them all and would use them liberally on any and all accessible areas and surfaces.


iv). Take battery out. No point letting it die on the bike really.


v). Be prepared to check tyre pressures periodically, and rotate wheels to help prevent deformation of rubber etc. Ideally I'd have the bike on a small dedicated lift like the one I use for my KLX250 - and keep weight off the tyres altogether. But two problems arise - firstly afaik no such lift exists (they're all way too high) and secondly this doesn't strike me as the most stable form of storage. A high wind or some kid pissing about could quite conceivably knock it over.


vi). Plugs out, oil down the bores?
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Jameshambleton
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Re: laying a bike up (storing outside)

Post by Jameshambleton on Thu 21 Sep 2017, 6:55 pm

-1. Cover the bike but don't use a bike cover as it'll make condensation form on the bike. I've always left mine outside with no issues but when I had a bike cover it was always covered in condensation on the inside of the cover and it was keeping the bike moist and wet all the time as it also traps rising moisture after it's evaporated after rain. Keeping the bike in something like a garage port or overhang would be ideal or something simular... maybe park it in an old tent
 
1. brim it! rust is oxide from oxygen, if there is fuel there then there isn't oxygen. so it can't oxidise/rust 

2. draining the carbs is a good idea but it might be worth starting the engine every now and again. On my vfr that's pretty much stood I run the bike for a good while every two weeks and give it a good ride up and down the tenfoot (for those not from yorkshire it's an access road typically made out of concrete and it's 10 foot wide that is at the back of houses) 

3. I don't have a view point really but I just wipe mie with some spare oil which I guess is the same as scottoiler fs365...

4. Keep it on an optimser or in the house and it'll be fine

5. ideally the mainstand or paddock stands would be ideal as it would allow the tyres to keep their form as the weight would be off them 

6. keep the plugs in and it'll keep the chamber sealed. If you put in oil you'll have to turn the engine over a few times when you want to start the bike up again to get most of the oil out as if you don't you'll oil fowl the plugs and then she won't start.
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eternally_troubled
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Re: laying a bike up (storing outside)

Post by eternally_troubled on Tue 26 Sep 2017, 9:22 pm

I'd mainly agree with James - whatever cover you put on you should make sure there is a *bit* of an air gap, just in case any water gets in - best to let it out again!

If you have the space then one good idea is to get one of those cheap-ish gazebos - you can then park the bike under it, probably with a cover - almost as good as a garage! Keeps off a lot of rain etc but allows air to circulate.
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liverpool_f_
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Re: laying a bike up (storing outside)

Post by liverpool_f_ on Wed 27 Sep 2017, 6:17 pm

Out of interest, why are you laying it up? In my experience most laid up bikes just end up dying a long, painful, garden death. Maybe also consider selling it and buying it (or a different one) back later or letting a friend ride it to keep it road worthy.
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trevor machine
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Re: laying a bike up (storing outside)

Post by trevor machine on Thu 28 Sep 2017, 7:01 am

I do agree with that, yeah.

Why am I laying it up? I'll try to be brief. I have two 500s - a *very* clean one and a scruffy but mechanically absolutely fine one. Former has 38k on it, latter 60k. Latter is also a frankenbike - drum brake on a disc swing arm, wrong engine number for log book, miles don't tally with MOTs. Clearly had a busy working life to say the least - and is on soft YSS shocks now too, thanks to me replacing its weepy Showas. Saggy side stand, etc. But there's no corrosion anywhere. And better still, it's just enjoyable to ride somehow. Gear box is incredible - best I've come across on any bike. Far better than the lower mile 500.

However I just bought a 2000 zx9r w/ 18k on it for £1.5k and it's sort of blown my mind. I had no idea bikes could be so incredible. Not talking power - although yes there's a seemingly bottomless pit of it with the "9", as they call it. What I'm actually getting at is something far more general - which is a constant sense of utter quality and refinement, that translates to amongst other things, relaxed, comfortable riding. Even with its relatively sporty ergos.

Now for the really treacherous part. I honestly can hardly bare to even look at my CB500s any more. I know they're great bikes for all kinds of reasons. But I don't feel owt for 'em now. : - (

Ironically I probably rode my 500s faster everywhere - especially and obviously through technical stuff but even on straights (!!) than I'm riding the zx. What the hell that's about I can't quite fathom. But one of my mates always said I had "small bike complex" - caning f*** out it everywhere, always trying to prove that the 500 could do as much if not more than any other bike on the road. Etc.

Since getting the 9 I just waft along at mostly legal speeds, still making progress wherever possible, but in a kind of serene, excuse me while I just whisk passed you madam, no offence. Whereas w/ the 500 it was more a case of oi shift it love we ain't got all flippin' day!!

I feel like I'm in the lap of luxury. This is by far the "best" vehicle I've ever owned - and I now start to get why people love bikes like this. I think mine is a little under-damped - it could probably be hardened off a few clicks (esp. at back). But damn - the proverbial  magic carpet ride is all there. Incredible. And the turbine smooth big il4 is, well, sublime.

Anyway, anyway. Enough of that crap. I'm having trouble selling the 60k bike (tried to get £500), can't sell the other one because....reasons (it's a long and boring story - which I'll relate, but only if pushed). So I don't really know what to do with the damn things. I kind of think I should keep one, the better one. The other I want rid of but it doesn't seem to want to go. Hate the idea of laying it up outdoors - because as said, it basically kills bikes. It really does. I do believe that.

Just going to have to try harder to sell it. Right time of year for the "winter hack" (hate that cliché) sale though, I suppose.
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Jameshambleton
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Re: laying a bike up (storing outside)

Post by Jameshambleton on Thu 28 Sep 2017, 2:30 pm

After I get sorted out with a job I maybe interested, if not I know someone who's guaranteed a sale with
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wornsprokets
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Re: laying a bike up (storing outside)

Post by wornsprokets on Thu 28 Sep 2017, 10:25 pm

Zx9 a great old school classic  bike...ive its rival fireblade ... the power is a bit more than cb Smile  as much as i love blade it a fair weather use bike....i wouldnt fancy it on wet damp winter road....these old school bikes have loads low down power  and mid range as there carb bikes  and  were not like later fuel early injected bikes and  then quest for high horse power and all top range and little low down.
.i keep carb bikes thanks... also fireblade wouldnt last too long in dublin city centre they way things are carrying on these days..i. stil love cb...
There is the bargain basent thing  feel with cb with fireblade its well built... but blade was expensive when new...cb was bargain price when new... money went on engine and suspension... cars move out of my way on cb 500v... with its sp enginnering exhaust(thanks andy c) with cb 500s with stock exhaust doesnt happen with standard exhaust much...
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trevor machine
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Re: laying a bike up (storing outside)

Post by trevor machine on Sun 01 Oct 2017, 10:25 am

Although I didn't know this fact before I bought the zx, the blade of the same era only ever came with a 16" front wheel (which only changed to 17" when going over to the later EFI models). The zx's 17" front was apparently preferred by many riders because it was felt to make for a more stable ride, albeit one that turned in more slowly. I've yet to ride a blade from the '90s so can't comment - but hope to put that right asap.

As of yet I can't find anything wrong with this zx9r - yes, it's a bit heavy, and yes, I can't quite chuck into technical sections like I could the cb500. But its refinement and comfort more than make up for that, as does its willingness to go ballistic through the sweepers. Honestly, you really don't need to rag it to reel in the vanishing points. For fifteen hundred quid this is an absolute shitload of bike.

Yesterday we went to Scarborough (Pocklington, Fridaythorpe, Fimber, Sledmere, Foxholes, Staxton - a standard route from my locale, but always a really enjoyable one), and I took my mate to Oliver's Mount. Insane circuit. But going through town, elbowing through busy snarled up Saturday afternoon traffic the kawasaki felt nearly as lithe as the cb500.
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wornsprokets
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Re: laying a bike up (storing outside)

Post by wornsprokets on Sun 01 Oct 2017, 11:28 am

Ive a cbr 400gullarm 17inch front wheel that goes straight in to fireblade and uses the discs from 16inch wheel no mods need even uses same spacers... i change it when  16inch tyre is worn out it be while yet though
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GollyGosh
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Re: laying a bike up (storing outside)

Post by GollyGosh on Thu 05 Oct 2017, 9:00 pm

Regarding the fuel tank, my advice would be if it is to be laid up for 4 months or more then drain the tank and get fresh petrol when you come to use it. 
Petrol has a shelf life and loses octane levels.  I knew a lawn mower repairer who made good money fixing lawn mowers in the spring. All he did was change
for fresh petrol and clean the plugs and came up with lengthy excuses to justify what he charged.

To avoid rusting in the empty tank a good spray of WD40 or similar.

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