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Pretty sure this isn't right.

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Grarea
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Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by Grarea on Tue 19 Sep 2017, 5:12 pm

IMGP1475 by chuffedas, on Flickr" />[url=

IMGP1479 by chuffedas, on Flickr

What do you reckon?
Zip tie or Duct tape?
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Fair Weather Rider
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by Fair Weather Rider on Tue 19 Sep 2017, 7:03 pm

Gorilla Glue............. Very Happy
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Grarea
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by Grarea on Tue 19 Sep 2017, 8:40 pm

Well, I have  put some chewing gum on it for tomorrow.
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eternally_troubled
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by eternally_troubled on Tue 19 Sep 2017, 9:10 pm

Don't open that throttle too much... Wink

Just shows why you should keep an eye on your chain, even if you have a chain oiler.

How long/far has the chain been on the bike?
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Grarea
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by Grarea on Tue 19 Sep 2017, 9:20 pm

No, I agree.
I have to admit I don't always have a really good look when I oil it in the poorly lit garage.
I am very glad I did today.

I won't be using it now until I have sorted it.
I don't like the look of it.

I don't know how long/far it has been on there. It was on it when I got it.
Judging by everything else on the bike, it won't have been looked after very well.

There are quite a few with cracks.
Is it possibly that something is wrong / out of alignment or is it just wear?

sullivj
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by sullivj on Tue 19 Sep 2017, 10:24 pm

The outer faces of the plates, look like they could have been rubbing somewhere, as they appear to be flattened compared to the other side.

Against the stand perhaps?
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skyerae
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by skyerae on Wed 20 Sep 2017, 6:26 am

I would have gone with duct tape myself, but seriously I have to agree with sullivj - even the side of the plates have rub marks. This needs to be rectified before replacing the chain otherwise the cycle will repeat itself.
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Grarea
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by Grarea on Wed 20 Sep 2017, 10:53 am

Good call, thanks.
I did notice the rubbing. But then forgot about it when I saw the broken plate.
When I bought it, the chain was rubbing against the stand. I sorted that.

However, when I looked at it yesterday, it has been rubbing afresh somewhere as it was shiny on the edge.

What do you mean by rubbing on the side of the plates?
Do you mean up a bit from where it has rubbed along the bottom?
Where it looks like it is rubbing in a groove?
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Grarea
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by Grarea on Wed 20 Sep 2017, 2:41 pm

OK, so, found the destructions for this by Teamster1975.
Awesome thanks.

1) I need to buy a chain tool. (I thought I had one from years ago, but maybe I borrowed it) Any recommendations please?
Or even, any recommendations what not to get?
2) I am right in thinking I need to do the sprockets as well right?  
3) Make a decision whether or not to change sprocket sizes. 
I am thinking I might lower the gearing slightly. I hardly ever go long distance and often are twos up.
Plus it is often uphill. Plus it sounds more fun when solo.
4) Could you please point me in the right direction for makes of chain and sprocket please?

Thanks.
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jonny10
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by jonny10 on Wed 20 Sep 2017, 10:56 pm

@Grarea wrote:

1) I need to buy a chain tool.... Any recommendations please?
2) I am right in thinking I need to do the sprockets as well right?  
4) Could you please point me in the right direction for makes of chain and sprocket please?


I got this chain tool. It's ok for rivetting.
But, faffing about with it when splitting the chain it's very easy to bend the pins, which is a PITA 
Much handier to just cut it off with a grinder if you have one & be done with it

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/MOTORCYCLE-MOTORBIKE-CHAIN-BREAKER-SPLITTER-RIVETING-RIVET-TOOL-REPAIR-SET-/331441328502?hash=item4d2b715176:g:DMUAAOSwlY1ZL~Kw


If there's any wear at all in the sprocket teeth, replace them.
Have look at Wemoto - I find the DID & JT set is dead on.

http://www.wemoto.com/bikes/honda/cb_500_sy_s2/00-02/
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skyerae
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by skyerae on Thu 21 Sep 2017, 6:10 am

+1 on the DID chain and JT sprocket set, although I used a vendor on the bay of evil (ebay) Still on the bike and going strong. +1 on using a grinder on the chain to remove it - I find it immensely satisfying. I did think that if I was going to be replacing chains on my bikes (I am fortunate to own two) I needed a proper chain riveter and opted for a DID splitter/riveter and this is substantial and works fine. It is expensive though but you can buy the pins individually when they need to be replaced. Just my tuppence worth.
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Jameshambleton
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by Jameshambleton on Thu 21 Sep 2017, 8:53 am

1) I think the one I use is a cheepo £15 ebay special but I'm not sure as it's my dads and it's unbranded. 

2) Always good practice to change the sprockets as well but completely necessary, but a chain and sprocket kit works out cheaper than buying all 3 separately.    

3) I personally run a +2 rear sprocket size though if you want to try it and not necessarily have all the issues and cost for a rear sprocket of it get a -1 Front sprocket, a -1 front worksout about +1.6 on the rear so should be pretty sweet.

4) DID and JT
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Grarea
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by Grarea on Thu 21 Sep 2017, 9:18 am

Great stuff guys, thanks.
2) I shall definitely do this.
3) I like the sounds of this, awesome.
I read somewhere that 1 tooth on the front was worth 2.5 on the back, but either way, one off the front sounds good.
5) If I go one tooth down on the front, I can still use standard length chain, can't I?
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Jameshambleton
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by Jameshambleton on Thu 21 Sep 2017, 9:30 am

5) Can still just the standard chain length yes  Very Happy
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Grarea
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by Grarea on Thu 21 Sep 2017, 11:33 am

Excellent. Thanks.
Can't find a kit with 14/40T, so I guess it is ebay individual parts.
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stormbringer
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by stormbringer on Thu 21 Sep 2017, 12:02 pm

+1 for the DID 525VX + JT kit. Mine's done 60.000 km by now, and only recently did I replace the front sprocket.

Point being that with the front sprocket roughly 1/3 of the circumference of the rear one, it'll wear three times faster as equal amounts of chain is being dragged across both. Therefore, replacing it early on will see the rest of the drivechain live longer... Weakest component drags the other bits down with it, when it fails.
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Grarea
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by Grarea on Thu 21 Sep 2017, 12:04 pm

@stormbringer wrote:+1 for the DID 525VX + JT kit. Mine's done 60.000 km by now, and only recently did I replace the front sprocket.

Point being that with the front sprocket roughly 1/3 of the circumference of the rear one, it'll wear three times faster as equal amounts of chain is being dragged across both. Therefore, replacing it early on will see the rest of the drivechain live longer... Weakest component drags the other bits down with it, when it fails.

That makes a lot of sense.
Now, where to store that information??????
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skyerae
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by skyerae on Thu 21 Sep 2017, 6:11 pm

When I finally got to changing my chain and sprockets, the front sprocket had two teeth snapped off and the rear sprocket teeth were starting to hook. The chain was completely cream-crackered as I had badly neglected it. It goes to prove that the front sprocket does indeed wear more quickly.
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stormbringer
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by stormbringer on Thu 21 Sep 2017, 9:22 pm

@Grarea wrote:Now, where to store that information??????
Hmmm - in your head?

As I realised the logic, I never thought of telling anyone, because it's so simple. Would you argue that water runs downwards in drain pipes?

Anyways - before proposing this info to be promoted to 'sticky', I'd like to have second opinions.

Anyone? Have I gone 'off the deep end'? Loopy?
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Grarea
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by Grarea on Sat 23 Sep 2017, 3:19 pm

Well, front sprocket is much more worn than the rear  Smile
The rear isn't too bad, but I will change it anyway now I have it.
I know where I am then.

a) I was reading the destructions and it states 'remove the tabbed washer.....'
I don't have a tabbed washer. I have a 'washer'. Does that matter?

b) I was going to grease the splines when I put front sprocket on, correct?
c) I was going to put thread lock on the bolt when I put the front sprocket back on. Correct?
d) I was going to put copper grease on the bolts of the rear sprocket (because it says so on the directions and that made me wonder if i should put it on the front sprocket bolt as well?
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teamster1975
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by teamster1975 on Sat 23 Sep 2017, 6:36 pm

@Grarea wrote:Well, front sprocket is much more worn than the rear  Smile
The rear isn't too bad, but I will change it anyway now I have it.
I know where I am then.

a) I was reading the destructions and it states 'remove the tabbed washer.....'
I don't have a tabbed washer. I have a 'washer'. Does that matter?

b) I was going to grease the splines when I put front sprocket on, correct?
c) I was going to put thread lock on the bolt when I put the front sprocket back on. Correct?
d) I was going to put copper grease on the bolts of the rear sprocket (because it says so on the directions and that made me wonder if i should put it on the front sprocket bolt as well?
a) Forget the tabbed washer, I was having a brain fart and was thinking of my mate's Daytona, I'll update the how to Embarassed
b) It won't do any harm, keeps the rust off, although fling from the chain lube will keep it pretty oiled up
c) I never have, just get it up to torque and it shouldn't go anywhere.
d) No harm putting copper slip on the studs, make sure you get all the old congealed crud off the threads first though and try to clean up the threads on the nuts as well.
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Jameshambleton
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by Jameshambleton on Sat 23 Sep 2017, 6:41 pm

a) no tabbed washer
b) not necessary as teamster said 
c) torque the bugger up and don't locktite it as it's a pain to remove as it is - also the thread direction and rotation of the sprocket means the bolt will tighten itself up into the thread opposed to working loose like other bolts. 
d) not usually required but good practice especially if you're riding in winter remember to torque them up in a star pattern so it'll stay done up unlike what mine did... loose rear sprocket
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Grarea
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by Grarea on Sat 23 Sep 2017, 7:24 pm

Great stuff, thanks guys.
Don't be embarrassed teamster, it is a great, easy to follow 'how to' and much appreciated.
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Grarea
Mothra the Radioactive
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by Grarea on Sun 24 Sep 2017, 4:45 pm

Re the front sprocket thing, Delboy (about 4m 20s on)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Yj4sKsguvU&t=3s

Reckons that JT have made the front sprockets harder wearing now.
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Grarea
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Re: Pretty sure this isn't right.

Post by Grarea on Wed 29 Nov 2017, 3:30 pm

Just a quick update on this.
I got the DID stuff.

I went down one tooth on the front.
The gears all make that much more sense now, I am dead pleased with it.

It might be because the power is down from when it was new that it works better slightly lower geared.
Dunno.

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