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underrated aspects of the cb500

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hh_12345
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Re: underrated aspects of the cb500

Post by hh_12345 on Mon 10 Apr 2017, 10:16 am

I find one of the underrated aspects of the cb (and not only the cb, but other similar bikes) to be that it is adequate.

I think  many people easily dismiss it as it is believed that a bike should be faster, smoother, more powerful, more dynamic for no particular reason.
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eternally_troubled
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Re: underrated aspects of the cb500

Post by eternally_troubled on Mon 10 Apr 2017, 10:16 pm

hh_12345 wrote:I find one of the underrated aspects of the cb (and not only the cb, but other similar bikes) to be that it is adequate.

I can see the tagline on the advert now 'Honda - the power of adequate' :)

You are right, despite my piss-taking...
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Beresford
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Re: underrated aspects of the cb500

Post by Beresford on Mon 10 Apr 2017, 11:13 pm

'Adequate' sounds like a put-down. I think 'sufficient' is a better description. Sufficient, as in 'does anybody really need more?'
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hh_12345
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Re: underrated aspects of the cb500

Post by hh_12345 on Tue 11 Apr 2017, 8:12 am

Well, the "power of sufficient" it'll be then.

Of course they would not be allowed to use it unless they feature a fine selection of forum bikes with at least seized engine bolts and blown rear shocks (mine including).

Laughing
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stormbringer
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Re: underrated aspects of the cb500

Post by stormbringer on Tue 11 Apr 2017, 8:26 am

We've been over that one-word-description before Smile
http://www.cb500club.net/t2738-one-word-to-describe-the-cb500
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TheWizardofOdds
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Re: underrated aspects of the cb500

Post by TheWizardofOdds on Tue 11 Apr 2017, 11:43 pm

stormbringer wrote:Back to thread subject: Underrated aspect of the CB500...

...Some may find the design sparse. I find it to be honest. But that's just me.

In a nutshell. It pleases the purist in me,  which is approximately 100% of me.
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TheWizardofOdds
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Re: underrated aspects of the cb500

Post by TheWizardofOdds on Wed 12 Apr 2017, 12:06 am

...And another thing!...Even after riding my K2 SV650S (2002), which is earning much respect I might add, with the CB you can never really be too out of control too quickly. With the SV , and it's pretty tame now compared to modern bikes, you can welcome oblivion in just a few throttle millimetres of misjudged enthusiasm. That schitt keeps the fun in check. I really really miss riding my CB.

*Edit,  annoying American autocorrectness. Not having it.
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John_B
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Re: underrated aspects of the cb500

Post by John_B on Tue 08 Aug 2017, 11:24 pm

trevor machine wrote:
Take the new cb500 - it's significantly heavier and makes markedly less power than the 1990s incarnation. Bar fuel consumption it is by all accounts a worse bike. A WORSE BIKE. It's a step backwards. It's the inversion of continuous development.


Having 'downgraded' from a 2014 CB500X to a 1998 CB500 Sport, as mentioned in my introductory thread, I decided to revive this old thread to say I am beginning to get how underrated the older model is. I'd turn that sentence round and say the 1998 CB500 is the better bike. There are a few reasons for that, and the fact the the newer model has to comply with emissions regulations is part of the story. Another part is that the old build quality was better, and in some ways the older model seems better thought out. And the balance is not all on one side. I'd take ABS if the older model had offered it.

The better feedback on the older model may be partly to do with having bias construction tyres.
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trevor machine
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Re: underrated aspects of the cb500

Post by trevor machine on Wed 09 Aug 2017, 5:05 am

Interesting - one of my mate's big downers on the cb500 is precisely the fact that the tyre choice is so limited. More specifically that radial tyres aren't available for it. I'm so pleased with the Michelin Pilot Activ sets on my two bikes that this doesn't bother me. That said, I don't ride in the wet very much so who knows - perhaps they have serious short comings in that respect. However, in the dry, these Activs seem to be as good as any normal road-orientated tyre could be - irrespective of their construction, be that radial or cross-ply. Bracketing the issue of longevity for a sec, they've always felt like they're offering excellent grip and "feedback" - so much so that even on the odd occasion when you can detect some very slight "give" (i.e. sliding) on cornering, they still feel right. They get warm quickly too.
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John_B
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Re: underrated aspects of the cb500

Post by John_B on Wed 09 Aug 2017, 11:02 am

We are told that radial tyres give more grip, and are probably safer in an emergency. Barring oil or gravel on the road, I am never likely to get to the point where modern radials let go without notice. Radials definitely give less feel. That makes old-style tyres nicer and more reassuring to ride, for me anyway. The older, narrower tyres also give a more precise feel to the steering. Maybe that is why older sports bikes like the 1970s Ducatis could have slow stable steering and still feel precise.

Because I got the CB500S I also find the fairing a big plus: on th 2014 CB500X you sit up in the wind and the small screen does not do much.

I agree that the press and the industry must know that pollution regulations have hobbled modern engines, and that rider modes and traction control are there to migitgate the problems rather than improve the bikes, and it is somehow dishonest of the guys who make a living from selling bikes to remain silent. If you look at peformance figures for small and medium cars you see the same story: newer models are significantly less performant than versions of the same model which are 10+ years old. A thriving bike industry is good for us all, as is clean-ish air, so I am not sure I would be any more upfront if I were a journo Shocked Maybe we should keep quiet about our shared secret of just how good some of these older models are, or everyone will want one Laughing


Last edited by John_B on Wed 09 Aug 2017, 11:11 am; edited 1 time in total
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Jameshambleton
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Re: underrated aspects of the cb500

Post by Jameshambleton on Wed 09 Aug 2017, 12:40 pm

I personally think that they're missing the main point which is fuel economy. Who's really going more damage to the enviroment me getting 67mpg on an older bike or someone on a newer bike doing 45-50mpg. 

The whole industry is screwed up using old technologies anyway, as none as far as I'm aware use direct injection. The still rely on an injector and the air passing along like a carb. Direct injection put it straight into the cylinder which has been done on cars for a long time. My fiends NM4 Vultus is as far as I'm aware the only bike which uses direct injection and he gets 100mpg with the most been over 140+ and it's a 750cc engine and he doesn't hang about on it either.
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Vardypeeps
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Re: underrated aspects of the cb500

Post by Vardypeeps on Wed 09 Aug 2017, 1:14 pm

Ace write up.

I feel exactly the same way, as soon as I ask too much the CB lets me know with a waggle and seems to settle straight after (tend to be on cold tyres)

I can't say my suspension is even in the best working order at the moment with the chrome finish on the forks fading resulting in misting on the leg and unadjustable showa twin shocks as the corrosion on the body of them seems to have got too bad to adjust!
All this on top of worn Michelin Activ's and still kept up to a BMW S1000rr riden by a 'fast lad'. I say kept up, I actually caught up to him riding at fast road pace after he overtook two cars in a sketchy manner and I waited and did it safely...

I tend to have these moments everytime I'm out riding on the CB500 and it can't just be my riding, the bike just WORKS and well.

Hmmm fancy the Lake District..... strap a tailpack to the pillion seat and fill the underseat storage you would be surprised how well it handles like that too.
Commute.....fits through any gap and I actually prefer the standard bars.

The CB surprises me with how little your inputs can be setting up for a corner. Hook your knees into the tank and just move your head with a small bar input and wooooosh! No lean angle required on the skinny wheels.

Love em, my new big bike and will be getting another if anothing happens to this one Smile
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ceejay
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Re: underrated aspects of the cb500

Post by ceejay on Wed 09 Aug 2017, 2:46 pm

Jameshambleton wrote:I personally think that they're missing the main point which is fuel economy. Who's really going more damage to the enviroment me getting 67mpg on an older bike or someone on a newer bike doing 45-50mpg. 

The whole industry is screwed up using old technologies anyway, as none as far as I'm aware use direct injection. The still rely on an injector and the air passing along like a carb. Direct injection put it straight into the cylinder which has been done on cars for a long time. My fiends NM4 Vultus is as far as I'm aware the only bike which uses direct injection and he gets 100mpg with the most been over 140+ and it's a 750cc engine and he doesn't hang about on it either.

"My fiends NM4 Vultus is as far as I'm aware the only bike which uses direct injection"

why is that?

isn't the 750cc engine on that thing the same as the one on the NC750?

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