Most motorcycle problems are caused by the nut that connects the handlebars to the saddle.

Indicator Improvement?

Share
avatar
Grarea
Laser Shark
Laser Shark

Posts : 205
Location : Cornwall

Indicator Improvement?

Post by Grarea on Wed 28 Sep 2016, 9:27 pm

I keep finding things that work better but are aesthetically worse.
Big ole screen seems to work.
Luminous yellow helmet.
Sounds like the old stock exhaust might be better.

Anyway, I am wondering about my indicators.
I like them, they are little. But the arms seem a bit short and I am wondering if perhaps
I should get something more visible. They are the clear cover ones (which aren't as obvious as the yellow cover ones)
They are quite small and also the short arm means they are a bit buried behind the plastic.
Making them less visible from more angles.

It seems like the old stock big yellow  numbers make more sense in all ways apart from aesthetically



I wondered what people are using?
Should i just get OEM or is there something better to solve all the issues?
Any pictures?
avatar
Alvi
Running out of unique names
Running out of unique names

Posts : 188
Location : Isle of Man

Re: Indicator Improvement?

Post by Alvi on Wed 28 Sep 2016, 9:55 pm

I certainly agree about the clear indicators. My wife & I were taking it in turns following a mate with these fitted to his Bandit the other week & neither of us could tell which way he was going at junctions. Some modern cars with these yellow bulbs burried in ginormous light clusters that also include the headlight - which, of course, is always on, are positevely dangerous. So, whatever you go for, make sure it's a yellow lens!  Wink
avatar
arrison
Four's a...something...
Four's a...something...

Posts : 152

Re: Indicator Improvement?

Post by arrison on Wed 28 Sep 2016, 10:10 pm

got these on mine, seem to do the job

avatar
Grarea
Laser Shark
Laser Shark

Posts : 205
Location : Cornwall

Re: Indicator Improvement?

Post by Grarea on Thu 29 Sep 2016, 6:00 pm

Alvi wrote:I certainly agree about the clear indicators. My wife & I were taking it in turns following a mate with these fitted to his Bandit the other week & neither of us could tell which way he was going at junctions. Some modern cars with these yellow bulbs burried in ginormous light clusters that also include the headlight - which, of course, is always on, are positevely dangerous. So, whatever you go for, make sure it's a yellow lens!  Wink

I agree, I have seen so many cars turning and eventually, when you get close enough, you can see they are indicating.
Especially in sunlight.
I am amazed that they are allowed, it seems so daft.

I reckon I will put it back to stock.
Looking at photos of CB500s they do appear big and bold.
Almost like they are made to be seen or something.
They look like they stick out further as well.
avatar
Grarea
Laser Shark
Laser Shark

Posts : 205
Location : Cornwall

Re: Indicator Improvement?

Post by Grarea on Fri 11 Nov 2016, 7:37 pm

I have now replaced them with some old stock type indicators.
Big, orange and longer.
I am much happier about them.

Also, you (the rider) can see them flashing.
Much less likely to leave them on.

Much happier.
avatar
eternally_troubled
Admin
Admin

Awesome!
Posts : 3678
Location : 'ere be fens. (near Cambridge)

Re: Indicator Improvement?

Post by eternally_troubled on Fri 11 Nov 2016, 8:06 pm

I think, assuming you want your indicators to be seen, then the stock ones are the best. This is also exactly the reason why other people take them off and put something smaller and less orange on instead Smile It's just a matter of what different people want... personally I'm quite happy with the stock ones.
avatar
Jameshambleton
Moderator
Moderator

Posts : 1868
Location : Bedale, North Yorkshire

Re: Indicator Improvement?

Post by Jameshambleton on Fri 11 Nov 2016, 9:21 pm

I personally use genuine cbf125 indicators on my cb500, at least on the rear - not had the change to change the front ones yet. Even though the ones on the front of mine are small they are bright and much better than the led ones that were fitted when I bought the bike.

sullivj
the 900
the 900

Posts : 2120
Location : Gatwick

Re: Indicator Improvement?

Post by sullivj on Fri 11 Nov 2016, 10:33 pm

I rather like the utilitarian look of the stock indicators. Big, Bold & Bright. What more could you ask for?

A pig with lipstick, is still a pig!
avatar
Grarea
Laser Shark
Laser Shark

Posts : 205
Location : Cornwall

Re: Indicator Improvement?

Post by Grarea on Fri 11 Nov 2016, 10:35 pm

Yup, and i do, i love them.
I think the little ones have a bit of a 'trying too hard' look.
avatar
trevor machine
the 900
the 900

Posts : 1186

Re: Indicator Improvement?

Post by trevor machine on Sat 12 Nov 2016, 7:24 am

eternally_troubled wrote:I think, assuming you want your indicators to be seen, then the stock ones are the best.  This is also exactly the reason why other people take them off and put something smaller and less orange on instead Smile  It's just a matter of what different people want...  personally I'm quite happy with the stock ones.

Fwiw I agree on all points
avatar
trevor machine
the 900
the 900

Posts : 1186

Re: Indicator Improvement?

Post by trevor machine on Sat 12 Nov 2016, 7:36 am

sullivj wrote:I rather like the utilitarian look of the stock indicators. Big, Bold & Bright. What more could you ask for?

A pig with lipstick, is still a pig!

Yes - they're perfectly in keeping with the styling, era and thinking behind the rest of the bike.

It's one of those bikes that doesn't seem to ever want to be customised, not even in the small arguably inconsequential details. Or, if they are modifications, they enhance practicality rather than e.g. cosmetic / image, whatever.

The bike's really just a plodder, for the most part. It just so happens however that it plods extremely well and might be one of the best plodders ever made. So good in fact that although I kind of want another bike, for the last three years I haven't been able to think of something to replace it with. I have these erm "crushes" on other makes and models, but I always eventually find something that puts me off. Most recently - the MT07. It's a twin and can sound fruity - but the ergos suck (seat's crap) and more importantly it's too soon for there to be any second hand ones yet.

But yeah - flashers. The stock ones look very dated but they're right for the bike and score highly in practical terms.

sullivj
the 900
the 900

Posts : 2120
Location : Gatwick

Re: Indicator Improvement?

Post by sullivj on Sat 12 Nov 2016, 7:49 am

Four touring, I also have a BMW 1200RT. It's a nice bike, but not a GREAT bike.

Whereas I consider the humble CB to be a GREAT bike for what it was designed for - commuting.  It's got a split personality - plod along half asleep, or wind it on like you stole it - it's equally happy either way. 

I see it as the tractor of motorcycles. Reliable and functional.

I wouldn't let mine go. With only about 18,000 miles now, there's plenty of life in the old pig yet!
avatar
Grarea
Laser Shark
Laser Shark

Posts : 205
Location : Cornwall

Re: Indicator Improvement?

Post by Grarea on Sat 12 Nov 2016, 9:20 am

I was chatting to a local bike mechanic.
About he 500.
He has a few bikes, but the one that gives him the grin factor on the local roads is his triumph.
I get mixed up with their model names but it was a 675.
I can't remember if was a street or speed triple.
Anyway, similar characteristics to the cb in that it is manoeuvrable.
Good fun in the lanes.
avatar
trevor machine
the 900
the 900

Posts : 1186

Re: Indicator Improvement?

Post by trevor machine on Sat 12 Nov 2016, 12:57 pm

(danger - long post ahead; reason - it's raining)

sullivj wrote:Four touring, I also have a BMW 1200RT. It's a nice bike, but not a GREAT bike.

Whereas I consider the humble CB to be a GREAT bike for what it was designed for - commuting.  It's got a split personality - plod along half asleep, or wind it on like you stole it - it's equally happy either way. 

I see it as the tractor of motorcycles. Reliable and functional.

I wouldn't let mine go. With only about 18,000 miles now, there's plenty of life in the old pig yet!

It's not really run in properly until 20k. ; - )  I like the idea of it having a split personality as well. There are *at least* two bikes in the cb500. Plodder / thrasher but also one that's good for town work, technical twisties, sweepers and longer jaunts. Most contemporary bikes do the latter two, a lot do the former two - but getting a decent amount of overlap across all four can be a bit difficult.

i). CB5 as town bike

Regarding the first of these four, the CB is - of course - ace at town crap because of its decent full lock (which discounts many clip-on / faired bikes imo), and refusal to get too hot and flustered. It can bob and weave weave well in grid lock - "momentum stops" are quite easy, and the feeling of balance the bike has at slow mph is always a pleasure. Keeping your feet up after others have dabbed or paddled is pretty easy. In that sense the bike flatters your riding - you can almost look like someone with a bit of a trials riding past!

2). CB5 on twistier routes

With respect to the second of the four, the bike isn't too phased when the going gets a bit more technical - it *is* relatively light, after all. Two other characteristics help. Firstly, its twin configuration means you don't have to juggle brakes and throttle like you might on a more free-wheeling in-line four. Throttling off is usually enough to lose excess speed, meaning you can focus on your entry line, and course through the corner without having to be silky smooth on and off your brakes as well. Secondly, it's got enough torque to make tight sections a bit easier than they might be on slightly bigger (e.g. 600cc) bikes with narrower bands of power.

As an aside, and more recently, I've been using the gears less on roads/lanes with trickier corners - fourth where previously third, fifth where fourth, etc. It doesn't seem to make a hugely significant difference to the amount of speed you can gain when exiting the corner. I mean, sure, if you're ragging the arse off it, maybe then. But 90% of the time these days, I prioritise smoothness over speed - and after a year or so of being a bit rev happy, I've come back to the bike with a slightly different mind-set...and found there's useful torque where previously I either hadn't noticed it or had sought more power, from further round the tacho. Life under 6k ain't bad. So don't be afraid to let that mechanical sympathy come to the fore a bit more often. ; - )

I rate this slightly milder side of the bike very highly - the one where its thrumming along at 65. It's so blissfully happy there - and it seems to somehow transmit that to you, through the bars and pegs, etc. Also, I'm secretly proud of myself for sussing out that "smoothness" is king - a virtue above all others, when on a bike. I got some stick for this off older, much faster guys I ride with - they said I'd lost my spark.

But I told them to get fucked and explained where my head was and they got it. It is, after all, difficult to argue that understanding, achieving and sustaining smoothness is in all probability a pre-condition of riding well at faster paces. But, even if you don't ever choose to do that, smooth riding always looks great, feels lovely and - to me at least - is a goal that's always fun to strive for. You can never be *too* smooth. ;- )

It also has the distinct advantage that it's always safer too - in part because it requires more concentration (i.e. better forwards observation, so you're able to give hints via more subtle, early inputs to the bike as opposed to DEMANDING them at the precise moment they're needed - this applies to brakes *and* steering, NB). But also because a more smoothly ridden bike is more stable - and will therefore respond more positively and predictably to whatever input you give it.

For a couple of months now I've prioritised smoothness over progress - which in practical terms means while I'm keen to ride to the speed limit, I'm less likely to be over it (particularly in "signed limits"). But it also means that although I'm maybe a bit slower in twistier bits, I'd win more brownie points for restraint, composure and pure damn elegance (!!). Incidentally, it's this kind of thinking that's made me realise I don't need nor even really WANT another bike. I feel like I can still be a fair bit smoother with the power and weight of the 500 - and so haven't really paid my dues, as it were.

However, I do sometimes think the bike *can* feel slightly top-heavy on tighter sections. Good tyres alleviate this - those with slightly softer compounds, and perhaps even a 70 profile to create a lower centre of gravity (though this might sacrifice a bit of comfort because it'll mean less air to float on). I haven't tried 70s myself.


3). CB5 and sweepers

So then - to the third of the four, i.e. the cb500 on sweepers. Like a lot of modern bikes it's very happy to find and track a line on those lovely A-roads you sometimes come across. It just doesn't have the speed that sportier, more focused stuff has. That said, if you know such roads well - and you're riding with someone who is unfamiliar with your chosen route, and who happens to be on one of these posh 600 super sports or whatever - the CB500 can acquit itself very well indeed. It'll gladly set the pace.


4). Touring on a CB5

Seat to peg is a bit short, thus crampy for those over 5' 10" - but the back seat is quite broad-of-beam and will take all kinds of clobber; tents, stoves, sleeping bags - they'll all perch safely back there with cargo nets and bungees. But, while the motor itself shrugs off motorway miles, and will sit all day at seventy/eighty, it's fatiguing to ride. Firstly, that lump's busy-busy-busy - churning away minute after minute, hour after hour. It's a bit hard to relax with all that grafting going on. And also the wind - the buffeting. Two hours, maybe. But three? Four? FIVE?!?!? Well okay maybe yeah. But not for me. I need breaks. It's a young man's game. Or younger than me, at least. However, if you yourself can handle it, the goddamn bike will blat its way up to Inverness with nary a grumble or complaint. And you get the distinct impression that it could do such jaunts on a daily basis.


I've erm digressed a bit from indicators so just quickly, I'll just say I prefer the round stemmed ones on the earlier 500s to the more angled octagonal ones on the Italian assembled ones.

Sponsored content

Re: Indicator Improvement?

Post by Sponsored content


    Current date/time is Wed 18 Oct 2017, 5:46 pm