Wishing you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year, ride safe! The CB500Club team

Goodbye to my CB500

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jimbobs63
the 800
the 800

Posts : 258
Location : London, UK

Goodbye to my CB500

Post by jimbobs63 on Fri 23 Sep 2016, 6:03 pm

Hi,

This morning I rode down to Surrey to trade my CB500 in for a newer 600 Hornet.  Sad to see the CB5 go after three years, but the trade in was too good a deal to turn down.

Anyway, I'll keep in touch with this forum once in a while, and I still have an Avon RoadRider front tyre with virtually no wear on it going for sale (see post in the For Sales section).

Ride safe!

Jim
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wornsprokets
the 900
the 900

Posts : 1278
Location : dublin

Re: Goodbye to my CB500

Post by wornsprokets on Fri 23 Sep 2016, 9:15 pm

Put  up few pics of the hornet...let us know how your getting on with it....and how its ....i am thinking of a hornet 600 as i had two cbr 600f2 years back but i love that cbr 600 engine.....( ive no intention of selling the cb either)
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ceejay
the 900
the 900

Posts : 272
Location : Bournemouth

Re: Goodbye to my CB500

Post by ceejay on Sat 24 Sep 2016, 12:02 am

So how did they compare? (riding there vs riding back?)? Good luck with the hornet, I'm sure they are good bikes

sullivj
the 900
the 900

Posts : 2131
Location : Gatwick

Re: Goodbye to my CB500

Post by sullivj on Sat 24 Sep 2016, 12:31 am

Out of interest Jim, where did you trade your cB in to?
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trevor machine
the 900
the 900

Posts : 1203

Re: Goodbye to my CB500

Post by trevor machine on Sat 24 Sep 2016, 4:52 am

I also would like an 'Ornet. So yeah - please do give us the pros and cons, strengths and weaknesses compared to the 500. My immediate thinking is that the ergonomics won't feel very different - perhaps slightly more cramped for knees and hips. Maybe a bit lower, but not much.

My main concern would be with how linear the power is. Obviously the CB is a relatively gradual curve with a slight bump at 7k - but nothing too dramatic to anticipate and/or ride around. However that 600 engine seems like it could go a bit too mental at 8k, but that there's too little beneath that. I also think I might miss the engine braking of the 500's twin. When riding with a mate on his hornet, I do notice him sometimes quite close in the mirrors - which I think is not down to inattentiveness but due to the fact that I often rely on the twin's braking to do most of the work in slowing the bike down. So consequently there's no brake light to give some earlier warning. I should of course get more into the habit of "showing a light" - i.e. just enough front or rear brake to trigger the light switch. That would probably be the most helpful and safe thing to do. I did go through a phase of giving three quick flashes this way, if there was traffic behind (e.g. when approaching traffic lights, and when entering 30 and 40 limits, or else if I saw a horse up adead etc.). But eh. It can be hard to sustain such assiduous attention to riding detail over any decent length of time.

I digress! I just mean to say two things. One - I think I'd take a while to adjust to the way the Hornet "comes on cam". Two - I'd anticipate getting through more brake pads.

Oh and three - don't be a stranger. And DO tell us all about the new bike!
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jimbobs63
the 800
the 800

Posts : 258
Location : London, UK

Re: Goodbye to my CB500

Post by jimbobs63 on Sat 24 Sep 2016, 10:48 am

OK,

Some answers to your questions:

I bought the CB500 from Ebykes, based at Dunsfold Aerodrome near Cranleigh is Surrey.  He took the CB500 back in exchange for the Hornet.  In fact I had asked him, and my local bikeshop (MM Motorcycles in Tooting) to look out for a Hornet for me a couple of months back, and he was the first to respond.

Secondly, comparing the rides -

The Hornet is faired and my 500 was unfaired with a small Puig Screen, so there were bound to be differences anyway.  In terms of feel just sitting on the Hornet, the seat is slightly higher than the 500, but on both machines I can put both feet flat on the ground (I am 5' 10").  I didn't notice any appreciable difference in the weight of the Hornet, although the faired version is a good 10kg heavier (if I remember correctly).  When you do get your feet up off the ground, the riding position is very similar to the 500, but perhaps with a little more space (only marginal).  My Hornet has the standard bars, as did my 500.

So when riding the first and most obvious difference is at low revs (less than 3k).  The Hornet, with the 4 pots, is so much smoother and less lumpy on riding steady or acceleration below 3k.  Given that I'm not normally a thrasher and do a lot of riding commuting in London, that is important to me.

Secondly, both the 500 and Hornet, when you do open the throttle through to higher revs, have a kick at around 6-8k upwards, but the Hornet seems much smoother on the throttle at least up to that point with of course more power available to accelerate at any revs than the 500 (well, it does have a peak of 97hp compared to the 57hp on the 500).

Thirdly, my Hornet comes with standard kit - exhaust, brakes, etc.  In this set up the brakes are rather more soft on initial braking than the 500, which was a little disconcerting when I first applied them!  However, once you do grab a handful they do seem to work pretty well.

At motorway speeds of course is where the Hornet fairing makes a real difference - I found it much more comfortable riding home at around 70mph than I did riding there on the 500.  And when I got more used to the Hornet, I didn't notice that I had let the speed drift up to well over 80 before easing back off.  I could sense that even at those speeds the Hornet had a lot more to give without me being ripped off the handlebars.

The standard exhaust has a wonderful vibey resonant sound at around 3-4k which is great as I tend to end up at around that rev mark much of the time, but then it goes a lot quieter below and above that range - as quiet as the standard 500 exhaust.

As mentioned by trevor machine above, there definitely feels like there's less severe engine braking available on the Hornet when throttling off compared to the 500.  I haven't found it an issue - yet - and I am very much in the habit of shifting down to use more engine braking anyway, but will feedback more on this as I go along. On the gearing side, with both Hornet and 500 I always thought that there should be an overdrive additional top gear - more than a few times I was looking to shift up, only to find I'm already in top!

So, at the moment my only gripe with the Hornet compared to the 500 is the front brakes - a bit too soft for my liking on the Hornet - surprising considering the twin discs.  Apparently Hornet owners say it is a recognised issue and easily fixed with a change to better (sintered) non-OEM pads, but more particularly the use of braided hoses.  As with the 500, a higher top gear for cruising might also be good, even if of course neither of them are really cruising bikes...!

I'll give further feedback when I've ridden some more, including country / twisty fun road riding as opposed to urban and dual carriageway.  Think that will show up some more differences between a faired Hornet and a naked 500, good and bad.

Jim


Last edited by jimbobs63 on Sat 24 Sep 2016, 11:03 pm; edited 1 time in total
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trevor machine
the 900
the 900

Posts : 1203

Re: Goodbye to my CB500

Post by trevor machine on Sat 24 Sep 2016, 11:34 am

Nice one Jim. Interesting stuff.
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Grarea
Mothra the Radioactive
Mothra the Radioactive

Posts : 216
Location : Cornwall

Re: Goodbye to my CB500

Post by Grarea on Sat 24 Sep 2016, 11:58 am

I typed this out earlier and forgot to hit send.
I shall leave it as it was (too lazy to modify)
we seem to agree (I used to live near Heathrow)

--------------------------------



Would be interesting to hear your thoughts on the two.
My last bike was the 2000 Hornet 600.
I want to say things like it was tighter etc, but i got it brand new.

I rode it for about 3 or 4 years, mostly just a 15 mile commute on dual carriageways.
Rarely had the time to go and play.

I definitely prefer the handling of the 500, but then there is a chance that I was going into corners hotter on the hornet than I do on the 500. Probably pushing things more than I do now.
But I feel like I have to think less about the 500.
I have had a good 10 or so years off it so comparisons are difficult.
I loved (aesthetically) the big fat rear wheel.
The engine is much smoother. (Although, I think my 500 is lumpier than it should be)

The power and torque is good fun for sure.
As said before, I have little legs and so backing into spaces needs to be thought about.
I could do it with the hornet.
I seem to remember the tank being a bit small.

So, as you can see, my comparisons are very poor. 
It will be interesting to see your thoughts.
I think the hornet suited my motorway and dual carriageway time well.
I think my 500 suits these roads local to me now better.
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wornsprokets
the 900
the 900

Posts : 1278
Location : dublin

Re: Goodbye to my CB500

Post by wornsprokets on Sat 24 Sep 2016, 12:50 pm

Jim, so hornet is one with the top fairing...so its a 02 on version... i think earliers ones from 98 on..  had old fireblade front 16inch wheel And rear one...and a smaller fuel tank...that only get 100 mile till empty(so i hear).. but newer ones from 00 on had bigger tank and 17 front wheel probbably off cbr 600f from 90's
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jimbobs63
the 800
the 800

Posts : 258
Location : London, UK

Re: Goodbye to my CB500

Post by jimbobs63 on Sat 24 Sep 2016, 8:30 pm

As Grarea said, the tank is small - only 16 litres including 3 litres reserve which will only give around 100 - 120 miles before having to switch over.  Mind you, I used to fill up at around every 120 miles on the 500 and put 13 litres in each time.

The larger tank only came in from 2003 onwards - mine is 2002.

And yes wornsprokets, the 2000 onwards Hornets all had the 17" front wheel instead of 16", and they specced the 17" tyres also narrower, the combination making the front end handling round corners apparently much more assured.

I note that the 2000-2003 Hornet with and without fairing has exactly the same dimensions in terms of wheelbase, rake angle etc etc, however if I remember correctly the CB500 faired has different wheelbase and rake to the unfaired 500.  So I guess a faired and unfaired Hornet should handle more similarly to each other than a faired and unfaired 500.

Jim

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