Most motorcycle problems are caused by the nut that connects the handlebars to the saddle.

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Vardypeeps
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New Member

Post by Vardypeeps on Wed 29 Jun 2016, 12:50 pm

Hi Guys.
New to the forum.

Had many Honda's over the years and just managed to get hold of a 1995 CB500 with 16k on it for £995
Loving the engine although I'm getting what seems like clutch plate rattle from a worn clutch basket when the bike is in neutral.

Looking forward to getting a new front tyre on so it stops tracking horrible bits of road and some wider bars so I can get to work with cornering action.

Bsed in Halifax, West Yorkshire

Speak to you all soon and I'll post some pics when the bike is to a photo standard Razz (almost never as I ride nearly every day).
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eternally_troubled
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Re: New Member

Post by eternally_troubled on Wed 29 Jun 2016, 1:01 pm

Hello!

Looks like you have discovered one of the CB500s faults: the clutch rattle!

I'm pretty sure that almost all CB500 have that rattle, it doesn't seem to cause any problems, or at least, I've never heard of anyone having a problem because of it (other than the noise!).

Glad to hear you like the bike, don't feel you have to clean it before posting a photograph - there are probably more mucky bikes on here!
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Jameshambleton
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Re: New Member

Post by Jameshambleton on Wed 29 Jun 2016, 1:27 pm

ET means his is so dirty that he poked his swingarm and mud was holding it together, when it came off most of the swing arm was missing Laughing  . 

Clutch rattle is apparently common although it isn't something that i've experienced myself. 

If you're ever planning on going up the dales let me know as I live locally and know some good roads so it could be great fun Wink I use the standards bars and have no issues with cornering or with scraping the pegs  Twisted Evil
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eternally_troubled
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Re: New Member

Post by eternally_troubled on Wed 29 Jun 2016, 1:37 pm

Jameshambleton wrote:ET means his is so dirty that he poked his swingarm and mud was holding it together, when it came off most of the swing arm was missing :lol:  . 

This would be funnier if it wasn't true  :)

Just shows why you should drill some holes to let the water out of your swing-arm...
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teamster1975
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Re: New Member

Post by teamster1975 on Wed 29 Jun 2016, 2:57 pm

Welcome Vardy! Smile
To be fair to ET I have a feeling mine will be the same when I get around to cleaning off all the crud on the swingarm...
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eternally_troubled
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Re: New Member

Post by eternally_troubled on Wed 29 Jun 2016, 10:07 pm

teamster1975 wrote:Welcome Vardy! :)
To be fair to ET I have a feeling mine will be the same when I get around to cleaning off all the crud on the swingarm...

Simple - don't clean it off ;)
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Vardypeeps
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Re: New Member

Post by Vardypeeps on Tue 06 Dec 2016, 6:14 pm

Haha!
Must remember to clean bike more often, should get that tattooed on the back of my hand
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eternally_troubled
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Re: New Member

Post by eternally_troubled on Wed 07 Dec 2016, 1:19 pm

Vardypeeps wrote:Haha!
Must remember to clean bike more often, should get that tattooed on the back of my hand

Maybe. Some 'strategic' use of a hose or a bucket/brush to remove the caked on crap on the underneath of my swingarm would have probably reduce the rate of rusting - it wouldn't have given the salty water anything to stick to - I'm not sure that cleaning *other* bits of my bike would make much difference :)

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