Most motorcycle problems are caused by the nut that connects the handlebars to the saddle.

chain

Share
avatar
skyrider
the 900
the 900

Posts : 1742
Location : preston lancs

chain

Post by skyrider on Wed 09 Mar 2016, 10:55 pm

how easy or hard is it to fit an o ring chain as I have never fitted one, all my bikes in the past have had a split link Neutral
avatar
Jameshambleton
Moderator
Moderator

Posts : 1807
Location : Bedale, North Yorkshire

Re: chain

Post by Jameshambleton on Wed 09 Mar 2016, 11:18 pm

Getting it around the swingarm can be a MASSIVE FATH as you need to "remove" it. Remove the end can, rear wheel, rear shocks, and the swingarm axle bolt. All whilst you're not trying to move the swingarm too much so that you don't pull the hose that goes to the coolant reservoir.
avatar
ceejay
the 800
the 800

Posts : 262
Location : Bournemouth

Re: chain

Post by ceejay on Wed 09 Mar 2016, 11:31 pm

In my experience depends on the quality of the tool you're using. I've tried a re-branded Oxford chain tool which was one of the cheaper ones but was a bit fiddly to flare the chain pin without splitting it (took two attempts so needed a spare link piece). Decent tools can be quite expensive though so one of those ones where it depends how often you plan on doing it. If you have one bike and don't put on massive miles may not be worth it, otherwise I'd read reviews of tools first before purchasing to ensure you get a decent one. The actual process is not that difficult and the tool should come with instructions. The only bit where a bit of experience helps out is knowing what a correctly flared bit should look like (can be over and under done) but studying some correctly installed ones first may help.
avatar
stormbringer
Moderator
Moderator

Posts : 1215
Location : Aarhus, Denmark

Re: chain

Post by stormbringer on Thu 10 Mar 2016, 6:42 am

Jameshambleton wrote:Getting it around the swingarm can be a MASSIVE FATH as you need to "remove" it. Remove the end can, rear wheel, rear shocks, and the swingarm axle bolt. All whilst you're not trying to move the swingarm too much so that you don't pull the hose that goes to the coolant reservoir.
Huh?

Nah...


  1. Get hold of a chain riveter.
  2. Put bike on center stand.
  3. Undo wheel bolt. Push wheel all the way in. Hand-tighten bolt to avoid thing moving around too much.
  4. Grind down two rivet heads (on the same link!) on your chain. Mind the spray of sparks.
  5. Use riveter to push out the link. No hammering. Nice and easy.
  6. Attach new chain to end of old chain using the old link as - well, link.
  7. Pull out old chain, replacing it with new chain as you go.
  8. Split new chain at correct length.
  9. Insert new rivet link, O-rings and faceplate as you would do with split-link.Cram as much grease into the moving part of link (inside the O-rings) as you can!
  10. Rivet. @ceejay has a point on 'how does a correctly flared rivet look'. Investigate.
  11. Adjust wheel position and chain slack.
  12. Fasten.


Job done.

This, of course does NOT take care of the sprockets. Exchanging sprockets requires the rear wheel and the engine sprocket cover to come off.

To do this, you will also need to remove the can. No biggie.

Speaking of sprockets; are you SURE you do not want to change those as part of the job? I sense a general consensus on this forum that the three go as a set. Or that you should at least change the front sprocket as it wears three times faster than the rear sprocket, making it the weakest link (cough) in your final drive. See below.

Someone once linked to a nice video on Delboy's garage on the subject of sprocket exchange. It was very instructional - including a great trick on how to properly lock the final drive  for nut removal. I think you will find it interesting too:
 

For you to compare with: I'm running a DID VX525 chain and JT-sprocket chain kit. So, far, this kit has done 38.000 km. I've just exchanged the front sprocket for good measure. I aim to inspect the final drive again at 50.000 km. If it's OK, next check will be at 60.000 km. Then 70, 80 and so on until it eventually wears out.


  • I ride in the rain. On a regular basis. This is Denmark afterall...
  • I don't use expensive, sticky, grit-collecting, abrasive-grey-paste-generating gee-whiz-magical chain spray.
  • I do use the cheapest chain oiler on the market. Loobman fully mechanical/manual bottle with plain 80W/90 gear oil. The best of british ingenuity, developed on the streets of London by motorcycle-couriers who need their gear to 'just work'.
  • I do clean my chain from time to time - mostly when it looks dirty. Not after every ride. I have a life, you know.
  • I care. The minute you stop caring about your gear, it will turn on you and give you grief. This also applies to women, jobs and most other things in life.
avatar
jerryfudd
Moderator
Moderator

Awesome!
Posts : 1744
Location : Surrey

Re: chain

Post by jerryfudd on Thu 10 Mar 2016, 6:57 am

I use an angle grinder to grind off the soft link mushroom tops (the two pins that look different as that's where the chain was joined and mushroomed over the top) then when they are flat to the plate use a punch to knock them through and off comes the chain. just remember to put something protective between the chain and the bike and do it when the link in question is at the 3 o'clock position on the rear sprocket.

then including the link you removed measure the new one and cut as above if needed put on the bike and install the new soft link and I personally use a 'whale chain riveter' which is pretty good expect there is a nack to it - which I forget EVERYTIME I need to use it and remember after every use but still fitted perfectly strong chains to 3 bikes now.

The only pain in the rear is it putting on the soft link too tight - some riveter a come with spacing plates which I plan to see if I can get made for the next time I do this. Oh and when setting the new outer plate don't in advertenly end up driving the pins out instead of the plate on (which I've done lol).

It's all a learning curve but like rebuilding your own forks well worth doing.

Dan

Oh and they are all technically ring'ed even if it's say an X ring. The X O etc just determines the overall shape (in some cases) and contour of the ring.
avatar
geoffnorfolk
Godly
Godly

Posts : 63

Re: chain

Post by geoffnorfolk on Thu 10 Mar 2016, 11:58 am

That's a nice video on replacing the front sprocket............... I was always under the impression though that you don't just replace a sprocket on it's own........ you do the whole lot..... sprockets/chain in one go....... as they all wear/mesh together and a new sprocket won't mesh properly with an old chain. That's an ingenious way to lock the chain to remove the sprocket nut............. I just put a long rod through the back wheel and over  the swinging arm struts..... much simpler. Not a good idea with old syle spoked wheels as you might damage the spokes.
Chain "stretch"............ absolutely right that it's wear, not stretch. The wear though isn't in the rollers.............. the rollers could in fact be completely cut off and the chain would still be the same length. The wear is between the pins and the inside of the "bush" that the roller runs on and this is the surface that is protected by the "O" ring.  Funnily enough, many years ago, they did start making bike chains that were "rollerless" with extralarge central "bushes" to make up for the missing size of the rollers. Probably a cost-saving exercise that didn't catch on..... the manufacturers tried to kid us they were better!!
avatar
skyrider
the 900
the 900

Posts : 1742
Location : preston lancs

Re: chain

Post by skyrider on Thu 10 Mar 2016, 7:36 pm

thanks for the info guys and yes I will be replacing the sprockets and chain at the same time Smile

Guest
Guest

Re: chain

Post by Guest on Fri 11 Mar 2016, 5:30 am

Small file or angle grinder to remove top of staked pin. Bought on amazon remover tool for said pin. Pushes out easy after an initial harder 2mm. Pull the new chain in while pulling the old one out. Don't forget to loosen the rear wheel. I bought an AFAM chain and got a free rivetting tool from AFAM as the chain and sprockets where at sale so... When rivetting use a measuring tool to stake the rivets propperly. Instructions came with the staking tool. Get a spare link, I had to do it over again the first time as I was pressing way to hard on the rivet to stake them. Good Luck and take your tilme, to do it well do it accurately!
avatar
skyrider
the 900
the 900

Posts : 1742
Location : preston lancs

Re: chain

Post by skyrider on Fri 11 Mar 2016, 8:23 pm

right thanks for that
avatar
freeride
Four's a...something...
Four's a...something...

Posts : 159
Location : Very North Essex

Re: chain

Post by freeride on Fri 11 Mar 2016, 11:22 pm

You should change the sprockets as well so I suggest you undo the front sprocket nut before breaking the chain. I needed a long bar on a socket to undo the nut.

Sponsored content

Re: chain

Post by Sponsored content


    Current date/time is Wed 20 Sep 2017, 3:47 pm