Most motorcycle problems are caused by the nut that connects the handlebars to the saddle.

Monstrous fail

Share
avatar
TheWizardofOdds
Mothra the Radioactive
Mothra the Radioactive

Posts : 212
Location : Moffat

Re: Monstrous fail

Post by TheWizardofOdds on Thu 01 Oct 2015, 8:29 pm

@stoney! wrote:I never remember to check engine numbers lol! is yours this one?

http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/yvette3/m.html?item=131598195764&hash=item1ea3dd1c34&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2562

Good work! That's the one. God knows why it's still on for sale.
avatar
skyrider
the 900
the 900

Posts : 1729
Location : preston lancs

Re: Monstrous fail

Post by skyrider on Thu 01 Oct 2015, 8:34 pm

perhaps he is expecting you to try and sell it him back Smile keep hold of it and enjoy
avatar
TheWizardofOdds
Mothra the Radioactive
Mothra the Radioactive

Posts : 212
Location : Moffat

Re: Monstrous fail

Post by TheWizardofOdds on Thu 01 Oct 2015, 8:54 pm

Werner, your bike looks the business. It looks survivalist or whatever that look's called. If I had one like that I think I'd need to buy a desert eagle. 
I totally agree with the sentiment of not having a minter as you're more likely to use it come what may. It's precisely the reason I bought a cb5 over a mk1 triple. Man, it was close. I knew I'd cosset the Triple. 
I took the bike out today. Amazing weather, roads, a few hours to myself, absolute bliss. I loved my wee ttr250 but this is another game. I live in the country and rode a lot of more or less disused A roads. I don't consider myself a fast rider at all as my skills leave a lot to be desired and I need to relax more on the bike but I gave it hell today. I really wanted to see what was what with this bike. By fast I mean around 80-ish. It seems to me that fifth gear is warp mode. I like the feel of the gear change. I like the fact that I don't get fork dive like you'd never believe as I did on the 250. I enjoyed just sitting in behind long lines of cars and just enjoyed the scenery. I see a lot of bikers continually overtaking one car then another and sit on the white line then overtake another. To me, that's too much like hard work. On the empty roads there are quite a few timber lorries and they're big buggers. So the scenario is me cracking on a long straight and a lorry pulls out of a hidden side road. He saw me, good man, but I was right if the throttle and it got me thinking if that dude never saw me I was heading straight into the side of his wagon. Gulp. 
Just some thoughts of today's ride. Cheers.
avatar
skyrider
the 900
the 900

Posts : 1729
Location : preston lancs

Re: Monstrous fail

Post by skyrider on Thu 01 Oct 2015, 9:00 pm

quite right you have to be on your toes and keep your wits about you, ride in the middle of your lane and not in the gutter where they cant see you when they are exiting a side road
avatar
trevor machine
the 900
the 900

Posts : 1100

Re: Monstrous fail

Post by trevor machine on Fri 02 Oct 2015, 4:08 am

@TheWizardofOdds wrote:

@stoney! wrote:I never remember to check engine numbers lol! is yours this one?

http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/yvette3/m.html?item=131598195764&hash=item1ea3dd1c34&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2562



Good work! That's the one. God knows why it's still on for sale.

I see nothing wrong with that at all. Yes it's a tiny bit dear. But one thing I always look at to start with, for a very quick litmus test to get an idea of what I'm looking at, is the state of the rear shocks. They go quick, being chromed - vulnerable to weather, even condensation. Corrosion spots, and worse, soon creep in and mar the finish. But if it's still on its Showas and they're pretty damn rust free, I'm already half interested in the bike. Next are fasteners, tank internals and swing arm. If they look well, I'm getting ready to ask for a test ride and looking for blemishes and issues to haggle on if it feels straight, goes and stops okay and sounds sweet. Others will have better and certainly different ways to get the measure of a bike, but regardless, this one still looks good to me. Sounds like it rides well too from what you're saying.
avatar
TheWizardofOdds
Mothra the Radioactive
Mothra the Radioactive

Posts : 212
Location : Moffat

Re: Monstrous fail

Post by TheWizardofOdds on Fri 02 Oct 2015, 2:50 pm

@trevor machine wrote:

@TheWizardofOdds wrote:



@stoney! wrote:I never remember to check engine numbers lol! is yours this one?

http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/yvette3/m.html?item=131598195764&hash=item1ea3dd1c34&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2562





Good work! That's the one. God knows why it's still on for sale.



I see nothing wrong with that at all. Yes it's a tiny bit dear. But one thing I always look at to start with, for a very quick litmus test to get an idea of what I'm looking at, is the state of the rear shocks. They go quick, being chromed - vulnerable to weather, even condensation. Corrosion spots, and worse, soon creep in and mar the finish. But if it's still on its Showas and they're pretty damn rust free, I'm already half interested in the bike. Next are fasteners, tank internals and swing arm. If they look well, I'm getting ready to ask for a test ride and looking for blemishes and issues to haggle on if it feels straight, goes and stops okay and sounds sweet. Others will have better and certainly different ways to get the measure of a bike, but regardless, this one still looks good to me. Sounds like it rides well too from what you're saying
The bike comes over great on the photos but believe me it leaves a lot to be desired. A lot of rust all over when you look closely. Some of the fasteners are going to be an utter mare to replace. The rear shocks too are not great, honestly. I took the bike out yesterday again and cannot complain at all. Maybe others with more knowledge would think otherwise but I went brilliantly. Acceleration is good, brakes are good and gear changes are fine. I'm enjoying it and am happy to have it. I think a little of my disappointment was knowing how long it'll take me to tackle it. I've got two young kids and getting time in the garage to fettle is non-existant just now. I'll make the time though, and look forward to doing it up. I've got my Haynes now so will start mugging up. Thanks.
avatar
stormbringer
Moderator
Moderator

Posts : 1186
Location : Aarhus, Denmark

Re: Monstrous fail

Post by stormbringer on Mon 05 Oct 2015, 7:54 am

@TheWizardofOdds wrote:The bike comes over great on the photos but believe me it leaves a lot to be desired. A lot of rust all over when you look closely. Some of the fasteners are going to be an utter mare to replace. The rear shocks too are not great, honestly. I took the bike out yesterday again and cannot complain at all. Maybe others with more knowledge would think otherwise but I went brilliantly. Acceleration is good, brakes are good and gear changes are fine. I'm enjoying it and am happy to have it. I think a little of my disappointment was knowing how long it'll take me to tackle it. I've got two young kids and getting time in the garage to fettle is non-existant just now. I'll make the time though, and look forward to doing it up. I've got my Haynes now so will start mugging up. Thanks.


Hmmm... The advert pic looks better than my bike - nicely one-coloured lump, good looking shocks etc.

I'd recommend you get hold of some ACF50 to stop any rusting dead in its tracks. This'll work nicely, especially if you've got somewhere dryish you can park the bike, like a shed or similar.

Remember, this is a working bike - its purpose in life is to move you around and put a smile on your face. A little rusty washer here and a blemish there won't make the riding experience any worse.

Munch up some miles and enjoy the autumn while you can.

Yes, going over the bike with Haynes in hand is a good and fun pastime that will make you smile too, but I believe you should save that for later - say wintertime - and  simply get the basics out of the way first.


  • Engine oil & filter.
  • Tires.
  • Chain kit.
  • Lighting. May I recommend an Osram Nightbreaker H4 Smile


With that out of the way, nice-to-haves can come next and when you have a little time to spare.


  • Chain lube automatics - eg a Loobman if you're not the chain-spray-lube-kinda guy.
  • Clean & polish.
  • Nice can. Really, your bike will transform when given a Fuel can. I'm talking Dr Jekyll & Mr. Hyde here.
  • USB-power outlet, heated grips, fox-tail, rim-tape, clock & whathavewe. Accessorize to your hearts content. Or not. Some like it simple.


But please; don't hold it against the bike that you didn't execute a by-the-book-deal. To give you something positive to reflect upon in this respect, know that I bought a similar bike for what equals 2.400£. More than twice your price. And I considered it a bargain.

Another subject: Do you have proper clothing? This regards personal safety and must not be forgotten.

But now, please go and check out the bike's party trick. It hides at 8.000 rpm Twisted Evil
I do this on a regular basis - works wonders to make the daily commute so much more fun!
avatar
TheWizardofOdds
Mothra the Radioactive
Mothra the Radioactive

Posts : 212
Location : Moffat

Re: Monstrous fail

Post by TheWizardofOdds on Thu 08 Oct 2015, 10:10 pm

@stormbringer wrote:

@TheWizardofOdds wrote:The bike comes over great on the photos but believe me it leaves a lot to be desired. A lot of rust all over when you look closely. Some of the fasteners are going to be an utter mare to replace. The rear shocks too are not great, honestly. I took the bike out yesterday again and cannot complain at all. Maybe others with more knowledge would think otherwise but I went brilliantly. Acceleration is good, brakes are good and gear changes are fine. I'm enjoying it and am happy to have it. I think a little of my disappointment was knowing how long it'll take me to tackle it. I've got two young kids and getting time in the garage to fettle is non-existant just now. I'll make the time though, and look forward to doing it up. I've got my Haynes now so will start mugging up. Thanks.




Hmmm... The advert pic looks better than my bike - nicely one-coloured lump, good looking shocks etc.

I'd recommend you get hold of some ACF50 to stop any rusting dead in its tracks. This'll work nicely, especially if you've got somewhere dryish you can park the bike, like a shed or similar.

Remember, this is a working bike - its purpose in life is to move you around and put a smile on your face. A little rusty washer here and a blemish there won't make the riding experience any worse.

Munch up some miles and enjoy the autumn while you can.

Yes, going over the bike with Haynes in hand is a good and fun pastime that will make you smile too, but I believe you should save that for later - say wintertime - and  simply get the basics out of the way first.


  • Engine oil & filter.
  • Tires.
  • Chain kit.
  • Lighting. May I recommend an Osram Nightbreaker H4 Smile


With that out of the way, nice-to-haves can come next and when you have a little time to spare.


  • Chain lube automatics - eg a Loobman if you're not the chain-spray-lube-kinda guy.
  • Clean & polish.
  • Nice can. Really, your bike will transform when given a Fuel can. I'm talking Dr Jekyll & Mr. Hyde here.
  • USB-power outlet, heated grips, fox-tail, rim-tape, clock & whathavewe. Accessorize to your hearts content. Or not. Some like it simple.


But please; don't hold it against the bike that you didn't execute a by-the-book-deal. To give you something positive to reflect upon in this respect, know that I bought a similar bike for what equals 2.400£. More than twice your price. And I considered it a bargain.

Another subject: Do you have proper clothing? This regards personal safety and must not be forgotten.

But now, please go and check out the bike's party trick. It hides at 8.000 rpm Twisted Evil
I do this on a regular basis - works wonders to make the daily commute so much more fun!
I somehow missed your very informative post that has answered some questions I was going to ask!
I agree with engine oil/filter etc. Those will be my first tasks. The tyres are fine no problems at all. I've got my eye on a DID kit of chain and sprockets, its a few bob but it is necessary. I was initially very pleased with the lights as my previous bike's lights were awful. I will go for the night breaker but I'd like some spots too. LED I'd  imagine. It's a right dark road to work. 
I have taken the scotoiler off as is was a bloody mess. Like an oil slick all over the bike. I'm going to stick to cleaning and spraying it. One thing, I have a Clarke hydraulic lift not the full table number but the one with the foot pump that you place the two rails under the frame and lift. I've not had a proper look yet but the sump sits lower than the frame is my nice lift now defunct? Does anyone use these? 
Fuel can sounds great, I was thinking about the leo Vince one just because that crazy Austrian on YouTube has one and I'll be damned, that boy can ride. Do they do the full exhaust, downpipes et al? 
USB sounds interesting and heated grips are a must for Moffat in winter. I had symtecs on my ttr250 and they were superb. Quality kit. 
I was going to buy the mk1 triple but decided to buy a CB and badly needed gear instead. New Arai lid, tucano urbano jacket, held trousers and altberg boots. Nice!
I have to sort mirrors. I don't know if its a route master or the rozzers behind me. I think I'll just get some from wemoto as the originals are £110. 
Regarding the 8k, I'm too scared to look down at that point! Took it out today and just confirmed my thoughts about getting some tuition from either IAM or ROSPA. You can read books all you like but you can't beat face to face expert help. 
Lastly, the v5 came through today and the engine number is on that so if its not the original then someone's already notified the DVLA. Either way, I could care less now. I've got the bike I want and will be able to get a good few rides in before the proper winter comes in. Then it'll reside in the garage where I can work on it when I please. 
avatar
stormbringer
Moderator
Moderator

Posts : 1186
Location : Aarhus, Denmark

Re: Monstrous fail

Post by stormbringer on Fri 09 Oct 2015, 6:02 am

@TheWizardofOdds wrote:Fuel can sounds great, I was thinking about the leo Vince one just because that crazy Austrian on YouTube has one and I'll be damned, that boy can ride. Do they do the full exhaust, downpipes et al? 

USB sounds interesting

New Arai lid, tucano urbano jacket, held trousers and altberg boots. Nice!
I have to sort mirrors. I don't know if its a route master or the rozzers behind me. I think I'll just get some from wemoto as the originals are £110. 

Regarding the 8k, I'm too scared to look down at that point!

Lastly, the v5 came through today and the engine number is on that



Fuel does the can only. Motad makes stainless downpipes. Nothing wrong with LeoVince, but before you buy, check out the Fuel range. All kinds of different shapes, materials and designs. Me likes choice...

USB: Different kits exist, or you can DIY. Depends on your needs. Mine was power for a cellphone/satnav in the lid of a tankbag. Aiming for a destination ~1000 miles away in one go makes you want to stay on track... I ended up making one out of a cheap cigarlighter-outlet-type, a small plastic box and some wiring. The box sits next to the fusebox and its USB outlet hides under the rubber lip over the battery/luggage compartment. Connect standard cellphone USB cord, close seat, guide cord up right side of tank to cellphone in tankbag. Job done. Setup completely invisible when not in use.

Arai, Held & goodies. Proper Smile

Mirrors: I've tried several sets and have found a set of cheap chinese bar-end-mirrors to be best for me. Proper wide-angle view, no vibrations, located so I don't just end up seeing my own shoulder, fold-in and even making the bike look  - well, different. Sort of no-nonsense. Total cost: 9£. See this link to eBay. Only caveat; you will have to remove the OE bar-ends, which is not easy - unless you know the how-to-trick. They're held in place by metal clips that grip holes in the handlebar. Applying force does not work. Unclipping does.

8k+: Before you know it, you won't be scared. You'll be wantin' to do it again... I think it's the engine's eagerness that gets me here. It's hollering 'Yes!!! More!! C'mon... YeeeHAAA!!'.

v5: Good. Simply because it matters to you.
avatar
TheWizardofOdds
Mothra the Radioactive
Mothra the Radioactive

Posts : 212
Location : Moffat

Re: Monstrous fail

Post by TheWizardofOdds on Sat 10 Oct 2015, 10:50 am

@stormbringer wrote:



USB: Different kits exist, or you can DIY. Depends on your needs. Mine was power for a cellphone/satnav in the lid of a tankbag. Aiming for a destination ~1000 miles away in one go makes you want to stay on track... I ended up making one out of a cheap cigarlighter-outlet-type, a small plastic box and some wiring. The box sits next to the fusebox and its USB outlet hides under the rubber lip over the battery/luggage compartment. Connect standard cellphone USB cord, close seat, guide cord up right side of tank to cellphone in tankbag. Job done. Setup completely invisible when not in use.

Arai, Held & goodies. Proper Smile

Mirrors: I've tried several sets and have found a set of cheap chinese bar-end-mirrors to be best for me. Proper wide-angle view, no vibrations, located so I don't just end up seeing my own shoulder, fold-in and even making the bike look  - well, different. Sort of no-nonsense. Total cost: 9£. See this link to eBay. Only caveat; you will have to remove the OE bar-ends, which is not easy - unless you know the how-to-trick. They're held in place by metal clips that grip holes in the handlebar. Applying force does not work. Unclipping does.

8k+: Before you know it, you won't be scared. You'll be wantin' to do it again... I think it's the engine's eagerness that gets me here. It's hollering 'Yes!!! More!! C'mon... YeeeHAAA!!'.

v5: Good. Simply because it matters to you.

Thanks. I will look into the fuel can. My exhaust is absolutely horrible, Like BBQ paint that's been trowelled on. It's peeling all over the down pipes and needs sorted. I might take the full thing off and sand it down and spray it, it depends on cash flow. Silly question, is the exhaust in two parts or three? Ie downpipes connected to silencer? I'm not sure if its a link in the exhaust or its been welded. The paint is so thick over it I'm not sure. 
Does anyone use a hydraulic lift for the CB, with the two rails that slide under the engine/frame?
I'm not sure about bar end mirrors I think I'll go with the wemoto ones and see how it is.
avatar
Celt500
Mothra the Radioactive
Mothra the Radioactive

Posts : 227

Re: Monstrous fail

Post by Celt500 on Sat 10 Oct 2015, 12:13 pm

@TheWizardofOdds wrote:

Silly question, is the exhaust in two parts or three? Ie downpipes connected to silencer? I'm not sure if its a link in the exhaust or its been welded. The paint is so thick over it I'm not sure. 

The standard exhaust is in two parts; downpipes + silencer and there is a gasket between the two.
avatar
wornsprokets
the 900
the 900

Posts : 1138
Location : dublin

Re: Monstrous fail

Post by wornsprokets on Sat 10 Oct 2015, 3:07 pm

I used a paste between silencer and downpipes it sealed fine. There was some type of gasket there before
avatar
TheWizardofOdds
Mothra the Radioactive
Mothra the Radioactive

Posts : 212
Location : Moffat

Re: Monstrous fail

Post by TheWizardofOdds on Sun 11 Oct 2015, 10:53 am

Brilliant thanks. I think I'll remove the exhaust over the winter at some point and have a go at refurbishment. I do like the sound of the fuel one though.
avatar
ashcroc
the 900
the 900

Awesome!
Posts : 1507
Location : London

Re: Monstrous fail

Post by ashcroc on Sun 11 Oct 2015, 12:36 pm

I had a fuel can on my last cb (now running a Remus) & the only thing I could fault it on is the lack of retaining 'ring?' for the drain pipes though it does have the centre stand support so it's not a big deal.

Delkevic also do stainless downpipes which are cheaper than Motad but doesn't have anywhere near the same length of warranty if that bothers you.
avatar
wornsprokets
the 900
the 900

Posts : 1138
Location : dublin

Re: Monstrous fail

Post by wornsprokets on Sun 11 Oct 2015, 2:24 pm

I wouldnt mind a fuel exhaust either,  they look like quality stuff my standard exhaust is solid just bit rusty, just euro to sterling rates a joke at mo maybe in new year some time  tongue
avatar
Basil Moss
the 900
the 900

Posts : 571
Location : Cambridge

Re: Monstrous fail

Post by Basil Moss on Sun 11 Oct 2015, 4:27 pm

Neither of my CB500s had matching numbers either.

The first cost me just over a grand, was very shiny and clean when I bought it, but in hindsight had clearly been round the clock once already. Motor was a rattly shaky lump with various false neutrals in the gearbox. Most of this assessment is with the benefit of hindsight, I loved it when I got it and was certainly more fun than the XJ6 the riding school taught me on.

The second cost 6 or 700 quid, had to be jump started at the sellers house and was thick with grot. I bought it because bike No. 1 had died and I needed transport STAT. When I washed all the shite off it at home it turned out to be a minter with 20k on the clock, and a silky smooth motor. Now got over 40K on it and running as sweet as the day I got it.

They are cracking bikes, ride it and enjoy it and don't be so harsh on the seller. If it does have a new motor, brilliant! Somebody thought it was worth replacing it when they popped the last one. But I suspect that it's original. If the previous owner only did 100 miles on it I really doubt he had the inclination to do such a big overhaul as switching the block.

Sponsored content

Re: Monstrous fail

Post by Sponsored content


    Current date/time is Wed 28 Jun 2017, 8:18 pm