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Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

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badseeds
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Re: Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

Post by badseeds on Thu 08 Oct 2015, 5:45 pm

I'm sold. Cheers!
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stoney!
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Re: Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

Post by stoney! on Fri 09 Oct 2015, 9:25 pm

Are you using wd40 on an O or X ring chain? Or just a standard one? I have used wd40 solely on the chains of my off road bikes for years with good results but these are basic standard chains. I was under the impression that wd40 degrades rubber and would affect the O rings over time.
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Celt500
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Re: Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

Post by Celt500 on Sat 10 Oct 2015, 1:31 am

jchesshyre wrote: commercial chain lubes in the rain attract grit and turn into an efficient grinding paste. You do need to apply it every 200 miles though or after any ride in the rain. This bothers me not a jot though.

You're not wrong there! I've been very disappointed with the ones I've tried, the Motul one seems particularly sticky, the Castrol one just seems to wash away in the rain.







...still think WD40 is the witchcraft though!  Laughing
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davebike500
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Re: Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

Post by davebike500 on Sat 10 Oct 2015, 10:36 am

MY chain gets scottoil and a little Silkolene chain grease
Done about 25k so far and still great

Oil is Silkolene Pro 4 in 15/50  changed every 3/4 k filters HiFlo   Motors on 144k  smokes when thrashed !!
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jchesshyre
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Re: Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

Post by jchesshyre on Sat 24 Oct 2015, 4:42 pm

Update: my chain, now with just over 16,000 miles on it with WD40 only applied, has developed two slight tight links. Despite the fact that I've only had to adjust it twice.

This is slightly worse than my previous experience with using gear oil where I'd normally get to this stage at around 20,000 miles. So I think I'll be going back to gear oil, but cleaning with WD40 more often than I used to (which was basically never!).

It's a bit frustrating that the chain's barely worn at all and yet there are these slightly tight links...although this is always what's happened with my chains, and I've been through a few over the years. Any ideas what causes this? I'm careful not to run the chain too tight, erring on the looser side of the adjustment tolerance (40mm play). That said, I do run the bike hard 80-90% of the time, so perhaps I'm expecting too much!
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eternally_troubled
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Re: Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

Post by eternally_troubled on Mon 26 Oct 2015, 1:23 pm

AFAIK the tight links are the ones where the o-rings (or whatever) have failed and the grease has leaked out and caused those particular links to wear abnormally fast and/or get gummed up with crap.
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jchesshyre
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Re: Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

Post by jchesshyre on Tue 27 Oct 2015, 9:05 pm

Yeah this is my understanding too. But I wish I knew why this happens in my case. I don't think it's the WD40 - my last few chains have all ended their service in this way and were never touched with WD, only gear oil. And in no case has there been any visible problem with the seals on the affected links. 


When I change this chain, I will open up the tight links to see what's inside. 


I mean, 16,000 (or 22,000 ish with my previous, gear oil only ones) miles of quite hard, all-weather use isn't bad for a chain, but neither is it astounding. Or perhaps it is?!


For my next chain, I'm going back to gear oil but applying it in smaller amounts than before but more often, probably after every ride if I can really be arsed with that...
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eternally_troubled
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Re: Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

Post by eternally_troubled on Wed 28 Oct 2015, 1:28 pm

I wander if it would be worth trialling a scottoiler or similar device with gear oil in it?

I'm pretty sure that one of the ways they increase chain life is purely by cleaning:  the new oil that is dripping on all the time cleans off the muck before it has chance to do as much damage.
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jchesshyre
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Re: Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

Post by jchesshyre on Wed 28 Oct 2015, 2:31 pm

I think I might just do that, and fit it when I fit the new chain and sprockets.

I expect I'll end up wishing I'd fitted one years ago... I did fit a Loobman a while ago but couldn't get on with it.

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Re: Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

Post by Guest on Wed 28 Oct 2015, 4:08 pm

Is it not possible to remove the bad links and replace them with those links that otherwise 'close' the chain when you fit it?
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jchesshyre
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Re: Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

Post by jchesshyre on Wed 28 Oct 2015, 4:09 pm

Yeah I actually did wonder this...spare links aren't expensive and there are currently only two that are tight. Anyone?

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Re: Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

Post by Guest on Wed 28 Oct 2015, 4:14 pm

...lol, and you'll end up with a chain 50% 'spare links' Wink
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jchesshyre
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Re: Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

Post by jchesshyre on Wed 28 Oct 2015, 4:17 pm

Hahahaha, yeah or eventually 100%! An entire chain made up of riveted links...I'll never have to buy another chain.
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jonny10
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Re: Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

Post by jonny10 on Wed 28 Oct 2015, 5:13 pm

jchesshyre wrote:Hahahaha, yeah or eventually 100%! An entire chain made up of riveted links...I'll never have to buy another chain.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BUl6PooveJE    Laughing
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skyrider
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Re: Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

Post by skyrider on Wed 28 Oct 2015, 7:37 pm

well there you go Laughing Laughing Laughing
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jchesshyre
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Re: Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

Post by jchesshyre on Wed 28 Oct 2015, 7:44 pm

Laughing
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eternally_troubled
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Re: Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

Post by eternally_troubled on Thu 29 Oct 2015, 1:30 pm

Werner Van der Straten wrote:Is it not possible to remove the bad links and replace them with those links that otherwise 'close' the chain when you fit it?


You *can* do this, but it isn't a good idea.

It isn't a good idea because the chain is worn - the new links you are putting in are not worn and so will be a very slightly different pitch from the other links in the chain and (more importantly) the sprockets.

So, two things will happen:  the new links you have put in will wear quickly *and* you will cause extra wear on your sprockets, so you might as well have stuck with the old links...
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jchesshyre
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Re: Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

Post by jchesshyre on Sat 31 Oct 2015, 7:01 pm

Well, I changed my chain and sprockets today. As promised, I pushed out the pins from the tight links. In this photo it's pretty obvious which they are! The middle one is from a good link, of course. It shows a little polishing but isn't bad for 17,000 miles. 


So it's clear why those links were binding. What I'm still unsure about, and would love to know, is why they got like this. I couldn't see anything wrong with the X-rings on these links but by definition they must have let the grease out for this kind of pitting to occur. On the bottom pin in the picture you can actually see that there's quite a bit of wear as well as corrosion. 


Anyway, I had new front and rear tyres put on today so I'm going out to enjoy them and my new transmission, and maybe visit a few graveyards... affraid


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trophydave
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Re: Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

Post by trophydave on Sat 31 Oct 2015, 7:57 pm

eternally_troubled wrote:I wander if it would be worth trialling a scottoiler or similar device with gear oil in it?

I'm pretty sure that one of the ways they increase chain life is purely by cleaning:  the new oil that is dripping on all the time cleans off the muck before it has chance to do as much damage.

I have been using scottoilers forever,usually with whatever oil I have lying around in my garage.Gear oil will work in the summer but once the weather gets properly cold its too thick to flow properly so I switch to engine oil.
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wornsprokets
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Re: Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

Post by wornsprokets on Sat 31 Oct 2015, 8:18 pm

I saw in a bike mag few years ago, a  guy had a cheap small oil pump can under seat of a hornet 600,he had a pipe from can  to chain and pumped a little oil onto chain each day

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Re: Trialling two controversial maintenance practices

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