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removing chain

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sinclairmic
Crotch Rocketuer
Crotch Rocketuer

Posts : 35

removing chain

Post by sinclairmic on Fri 06 Feb 2015, 1:38 am

Hi all, I need to remove my chain to give it a proper clean. Its hard to do whilst still on the bike. What is the best way to remove it prefrably without removing the wheel. And placing it back on. Can I simply slacken it off enough to remove from the sprockets and retighten when its back on?
Thanks in advance mike

sullivj
the 900
the 900

Posts : 2099
Location : Gatwick

Re: removing chain

Post by sullivj on Fri 06 Feb 2015, 6:24 am

Our chains don't have a bicycle style chain link.

Unless you want to break the chain or remove the swinging arm and front sprocket, I think you need to leave it on the bike.

Put a rag on the floor and a large piece of card between the chain and the wheel. It stops some of the mess as you clean it in situ.
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stormbringer
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Posts : 1200
Location : Aarhus, Denmark

Re: removing chain

Post by stormbringer on Fri 06 Feb 2015, 8:01 am

@sullivj wrote:Our chains don't have a bicycle style chain link.


Actually, it's possible that sinclairmic's chain is joined with a spring circlip. They do exist...

If it is, slackening off the rear wheel and extracting the chain would be possible.
Putting it back on would then require removing the front sprocket cover, degunk the area around the sprocket, the chain slider and the rear sprocket, slide the chain back on and reconnect the spring link properly. Then retighten the rear wheel making sure chain is properly aligned with sprocket. It's doable allright. But IMHO it ain't easier than degunking the chain in situ.

If there's no spring link, the chain must not be broken - it's not designed for that. I'd definitively recommend cleaning it in situ.

I think Sullivj will happily tell you all there is to know about cleaning chains. He's quite good at cleaning things Smile


My take on keeping the chain reasonably clean goes like this:

Don't use spraycan-based sticky chain lube. It sticks to the chain allright - and causes all kinds of crap to stick to the chain, where it gets ground into an abrasive dark-grey paste making your chain look like crap.

Use oil. Yes, it flings off as you go. But it takes any crud that has stuck to the chain with it in the process. Your rear rim/tire will become dirty, but it's relatively easy to clean. And your chain will look good!

Oiling your chain must be done often. Which makes getting a manual/semi/fully automatic chain oiler a good idea.
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skyrider
the 900
the 900

Posts : 1730
Location : preston lancs

Re: removing chain

Post by skyrider on Fri 06 Feb 2015, 8:26 pm

I prefer a split link on my chains it makes life a whole lot easier because if you keep your  old chain you can take the link off your present chain fix the old one on the end of the new one and just slowly draw the chains along that way you don't have to split the front sprocket casing,and after you have given it a good clean just repeat the process
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skyrider
the 900
the 900

Posts : 1730
Location : preston lancs

Re: removing chain

Post by skyrider on Fri 06 Feb 2015, 9:28 pm

I use link-life on chains brilliant stuff
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badseeds
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Posts : 1792
Location : Beccles, Suffolk

Re: removing chain

Post by badseeds on Fri 06 Feb 2015, 11:37 pm

If you've got, or plan to buy, a cheap chain-splitter, grind the heads off the link on the old chain before pressing them out - the cheap kits tend to be made of Monkey Metal™ and grinding the heads off will prevent the pins from bending.

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