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Questions from a newbie

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Ray Baxter
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Questions from a newbie

Post by Ray Baxter on Fri 19 Sep 2014, 11:51 pm

Hi Guys,

I'm the new owner of a 2004 cbf500 - my first 'big' bike. Love it!I would really appreciate some advice from experienced riders.

I have a couple of basic questions. The bike runs great and is smooth and tight to ride. Everything works as it should. I'm still adjusting to riding something that revs much higher than my car. At 70 mph the bike is at about 6000 rpm. Is it OK for the engine to run at these revs for long periods of time? I wouldn't dream of running my car at these revs and don't understand why a bike is any different.

Also, any suggestions for winter mods. I live in scotland and plan to commute through the winter and any practical advice will be much appreciated. Cheers Ray
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jchesshyre
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Re: Questions from a newbie

Post by jchesshyre on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 12:12 am

Don't let the revs worry you – with correct servicing and oil level this engine could run at 10,000 rpm all day and be fine for miles. The reason they can and car engines can't is because (a) all the engine parts are about 1/2 to 1/4 of the size of the parts of an average car engine, and therefore lighter with less momentum and (b) they are built to tighter tolerances. A well-built car engine could run at near redline for miles as well if the oil was adequate, but car engines generally rev lower than bike engines because they're bigger. Some ship engines can barely reach 300 rpm, while the Honda CBR250 redlined at 19,000 rpm. Just make sure you change the oil according to spec and don't let it run low.

Also don't rev the engine or drive it hard until the temperature gauge moves away from the C mark. In winter this can take a good 15-20 minutes of riding.

As far as winter prep is concerned: some fork gaitors will save you masses of time, hassle and money. That's more or less all you need. I've run mine through six winters with little more than that. Also lube your chain like an obsessive during the months they're putting salt down, ideally (in my experience) with sparing amounts of gear oil. Check tyre pressures once a week. It goes without saying but if temperatures are 3 degrees or lower then there may be ice around. I've never let that stop me but if you're on any road that you're not sure is salted you need to be hugely careful. Even on those that are, bits of surface water can freeze and catch you out. Good for you for being up for riding through winter though – not everyone does! I'd say get some good thermals but you probably know that. . . Also Heat Holder socks are amazing.


Last edited by jchesshyre on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 12:28 am; edited 1 time in total
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jchesshyre
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Re: Questions from a newbie

Post by jchesshyre on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 12:28 am

By the way, you will notice that if you go for a ride and, providing the engine's warmed up, give it some proper beans a few times reaching near or at the redline, the engine will feel grateful. I promise! Honestly, don't fear the revs. The redline is at 10,500 for a reason!
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Ray Baxter
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Re: Questions from a newbie

Post by Ray Baxter on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 12:30 am

Thanks for this - great explanation, regarding momentum forces and the increased mass of a car engine. 

I have ordered a complete lot of new fluids and plan to change next week. Thanks again, Ray

sullivj
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Re: Questions from a newbie

Post by sullivj on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 12:38 am

Hi Ray.

Welcome to the forum. As other have said, don't fear the revs, especially when it's warm.

How about some heated grips for a bit of extra comfort?
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stevew
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Re: Questions from a newbie

Post by stevew on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 3:29 pm

@sullivj wrote:Hi Ray.

Welcome to the forum. As other have said, don't fear the revs, especially when it's warm.

How about some heated grips for a bit of extra comfort?

And possibly some decent handlebar muffs. I use the Tucano ones like these.

http://overlandmag.com/features/tucano-urbano-handlebar-muffs/

Real cosy Wink
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stormbringer
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Re: Questions from a newbie

Post by stormbringer on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 6:43 pm

Welcome!

Honda made it real easy: Keep the needle out of the red, and you'll get tired before the bike does. Unless you neglect the oil.

Recently did 400 km@7000+ rpm (northern germany Autobahn; no speed limit). Bike just shrugged it all off - it even seemed to like it Wink

As others said: Don't fear the revs - frolic in 'em. I hit +8k on a daily basis - it makes for a joyful ride to work. I'm not lying here; when the alarm clock goes off, it means 'WARNING: Fun in less than 15 minutes' to me.


Winter kit? To me, that's a dry garage, a heater and a well-organized toolset. Five years of riding a much smaller machine taught me to avoid handling vehicles heavier than myself. The CB is much heavier... No thanks.

If you're determined on trying, then my advice would be knobby tires and wind protection. Because you DO have adequate crash protection, right?
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Ray Baxter
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Re: Questions from a newbie

Post by Ray Baxter on Sun 21 Sep 2014, 9:03 am

He guys = thanks again for the advice. I will buy some of those muffs (Tucano?) - they look like a good deal. I rode yesterday and gave it some "beans" as suggested - good fun for sure Very Happy Very Happy

I have considered changing to winter tyres. It presently has a pair of Battalax = plenty of tread. I really don't know where to start in making sure that any change would be better. How do I make a good decision? Would nobbly tyres actually be any better on the road? I read somewhere that the tyres reduced surface area will provide less grip on a wet road.

Cheers, Ray
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ashcroc
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Re: Questions from a newbie

Post by ashcroc on Sun 21 Sep 2014, 10:22 am

Bt45's should be fine in most weathers though they got a bit tricky the one time I got caught in snow. Bridgestone recommend higher pressures than the honda ones. I can't remember what they are off the top of my head but there are plenty posts on the forum if you search.
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teamster1975
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Re: Questions from a newbie

Post by teamster1975 on Sun 21 Sep 2014, 10:44 am

@ashcroc wrote:Bt45's should be fine in most weathers though they got a bit tricky the one time I got caught in snow. Bridgestone recommend higher pressures than the honda ones. I can't remember what they are off the top of my head but there are plenty posts on the forum if you search.

Rear 40 PSI, front 36 PSI.
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Ray Baxter
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Re: Questions from a newbie

Post by Ray Baxter on Sun 21 Sep 2014, 11:32 am

mine are BT02's - are these original spec?
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teamster1975
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Re: Questions from a newbie

Post by teamster1975 on Sun 21 Sep 2014, 1:42 pm

I've never heard of BT02's to be honest! Most folk here go with the BT45's and several other brands which slip my memory.
Just found this link which lists all the Battlax tyres they do.

Edit: Found the BT002, it's a discontinued race tyre apparently!
http://www.bridgestone.co.uk/moto/discontinued-tyres/
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stevew
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Re: Questions from a newbie

Post by stevew on Sun 21 Sep 2014, 5:09 pm

Suppose you could go for a Dual sport tyre that is intended for 80% road use like the Michelin Anakee 2 but that particular one isn't available in the right sizes.  Maybe one of the other tyre manufacturers has something similar in the right sizes.
Not sure it will make any really significant difference when compared with a good road tyre here in the UK.  Water is the main prob here not snow and slush.

For what it's worth my bike is going to get a set of these for the winter;-
http://www.savatech.eu/novelties/new-tyres/400-mc50-m-racer-new-motorcycle-tyre.html
Price is good too, from Dave Wilkins bikes in Penge, SE London.
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Gonzumzum
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Re: Questions from a newbie

Post by Gonzumzum on Mon 22 Sep 2014, 3:22 pm

Hello mate! And welcome!

About the revs, do not worry.
6000 rpm is like sleep pulse for the CB5.

About tires, i recently got these.

http://www.goldentyre.com/en/dt_portfolio/gt-260-road-tyre-bike-road-homologated/

Got them cheaper than bridgestones or metzelers.
I am really enjoying them, and they provide higher grip than previous tires i had, because the rubber is so soft. Grip in the wet is outstanding.
About long term durability, i have no idea, since they are 2 weeks old. Smile

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Stooby2
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Re: Questions from a newbie

Post by Stooby2 on Wed 24 Sep 2014, 9:54 pm

I'd stick with the Bridgestones to be honest. I've used them for years without issue and if there's snow on the road the bike stays where it is and I'll use the Discovery to go to work. I think they give good grip in the dry or wet and last well.

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