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Project hooligan!

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G3o
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Project hooligan!

Post by G3o on Thu 10 Jan 2013, 7:13 pm

As there was some mild interest in my introduction thread i thought i'd stick up a post of my work to date and then carry on from there as i continue work.

I bought the bike a few months ago after an "accidental bid" on ebay when I'd got back from the pub in a state of disarray. It was to my great surprise when I got an email mid week telling my I'd won the bike as I had no recollection of even looking at it! But no matter, I'm not one to turn down a new bike, especially when it only cost me £550.

As soon as I realised i had a new bike on the way my first stop was google to find out any common points of improvement, and almost immediately afterwards made a call to Hagon and ordered Fully adjustable rear shocks and progressive fork springs







And then dropped a line to demon tweeks and got a braided front break line, renthal flat bars and some medium compound grips:







All of this arrived before i'd even picked the bike up.

A week later, off I trot to Birmingham (from mid wiltshire) and pick up the new steed. Get it back without... too much incident, the old tyres were appalling and the rear loved stepping out on the wet roads.

As soon as i got it home i gave it a scrub down and took a starting photo to compare with as the bike progressed:



I then immediately start ripping the bike apart and fitting all the new parts, I got half way through fitting the Hagon shocks when I realise they're upside down. Took them back off to investigate and the bushes are in the wrong ends.

After 10 mins of pushing twisting swearing and general profanity I realise I'm not going to get them out with my bare hands. So the ingenuity cap came out and i rooted around it my toolbox, Before long i came across an old quick action throttle off a pit bike and adapted it as a puller with a couple of nuts bolts and washers:





Then back to the bike and got them fitted :

Standard:


Hagon:


Got the fork springs fitted which was dull boring and not photo worthy! (Or i just forgot)

I then ran into a slight problem with the break line, The position that i'd fitted the bars/switch gear in left the small tag that sits behind the banjo bolt catching on the RHS fork leg. Even after i'd taken a hack saw to it there was still limited movement in rotation so it ended up a tad wonky:





I then started looking at the exhaust, it was far too low, i'd already caught it on the floor going round a corner a tad over enthusiastically so something had to be done!

I had another root about in my magic box of wonder and found an exhaust from an FZR 1000 that i'd picked up somewhere, as well as a few bits of old pipe that looked about the right size. A bit of sawing and welding, lots more swearing and profanity and a severed finger later i had a new exhaust and link pipe:

(I apologise for the welding, it was done AFTER the finger mutilating incident)




Then i decided it wasn't shiny enough so i got the buffing wheels out!



and decided i should .. ahem, reattach... something that must have fallen off




This is how the bike now stood:



Scrapped the rear chain guard and front sprocket cover purely because I felt I needed to change something on the bike:





... Then i fell off.

...

...

haha, Pulled into a layby desperate for a pee and failed to notice the large piles of gravel in my way, hard on the breaks + gravel = floor! Damage was minimal to both me and the bike, I've had much worse:

The path of the front wheel:



The path of me:



And in relation to each other;



Slight dent on the tank:



And that was the extent of the damage.

Shortly after this one of the indicators stopped working with no discernible reason. I had a root around at the roadside to see if there were any loose connections but all I achieved was stopping the other indicators working.

When I got home and pulled the thing apart I discovered some of the worst wiring I've seen on a bike to date:

This was the wiring to one of the indicators:







And the bike was riddled with similar attempts at electrical competence, all of which failed miserably!

I went through and rectified a lot of the problems with decent crimps and waterproof housings:





I then came to the cosmetic side of things, I really couldn't be bothered with the prep work and time needed to respray the bike so i decided it would be a good idea to get the heat gun out and vinyl wrap the thing.

Before:



After:





Before:



After:





I also added some engine covers:



etc.etc. and then the bike looked like:



At current that is where the bike stands, I've not even started work on the engine side of things yet but I will be starting work on the airbox before long, I'm also in the process of designing some fully adjustable rear sets.
The design is in its very basic stages at the moment and will be much more pretty when it is finished but just an idea of how it will look:





I will be moving over to a push rod design for the gear change rather than having the lever bolt directly to the gear change shaft and i will most likely be switching to an inline break light switch to save on weight and extra fiddly bits.

I've also got a plan for a wheel conversion as the standard wheels seem to be made of heavium! I also plan on enlarging and raising the engine ports, along with a fair bit of other engine work, lightened fly wheels and cranks, skimmed heads, flowed crank cases and turbos have all been contemplated and could well come to fruition if the bike survives long enough! I will keep you updated on progress :]
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teamster1975
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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by teamster1975 on Thu 10 Jan 2013, 7:53 pm

That was an excellent read, thanks for sharing!

Whoever "wired" up the bike previously needs shooting. What an abortion!
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Hario
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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by Hario on Fri 11 Jan 2013, 12:37 pm

Love the thread G3o, thanks for sharing this Wink


How are you finding those upgraded hagon shocks? i got some standard ones recently and was pretty torn between the two.
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eternally_troubled
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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by eternally_troubled on Fri 11 Jan 2013, 1:08 pm

Looks like fun. I will be interested to hear what you manage to do to the engine. The CB500 is pretty reliable, so you've got a good starting point.

Rumour has it that Honda made a 'special' CB500 with a somewhat modified engine that put out 70 bhp instead of the normal 50. I have tried looking for info on how they did it and I've never been able to find any.

Might be worth getting yours dyno'd in its current state so you will know how much difference your modifications have made...
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G3o
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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by G3o on Fri 11 Jan 2013, 5:31 pm

Hario wrote:Love the thread G3o, thanks for sharing this Wink


How are you finding those upgraded hagon shocks? i got some standard ones recently and was pretty torn between the two.

Cheers, If you mean in comparison to the standard CB500 shocks then there is absolutely no comparison imho, the standard suspension is floppy and totally unpredictable. In relation to the non-adjustable Hagon shocks i couldn't say as i've never used them but as far as i am aware they are all the same basic spec just with different levels of adjustability.

Personally I'm very particular about my suspension set up, i find even the most minor adjustment to have a noticeable affect on the feel and feedback of the bike. Some people say they can change the adjustments up down or anywhere in between and they don't notice any difference.

Its hard to say if its worth it or not tbh, I ride around like a lunatic with a death wish, and i found them worth their weight in gold!
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G3o
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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by G3o on Fri 11 Jan 2013, 5:39 pm

eternally_troubled wrote:Looks like fun. I will be interested to hear what you manage to do to the engine. The CB500 is pretty reliable, so you've got a good starting point.

Rumour has it that Honda made a 'special' CB500 with a somewhat modified engine that put out 70 bhp instead of the normal 50. I have tried looking for info on how they did it and I've never been able to find any.

Might be worth getting yours dyno'd in its current state so you will know how much difference your modifications have made...

I will be sure to keep you updated on the progress, I do plan on getting the bike dyno'd before i start any work on the engine. Unless i go completely insane i don't expect to see too much in the way of power gains. The biggest thing that will be noticeable is the fueling and power curve, they should be a lot smoother and throttle response should improve considerably. However there is always the possibility i will got completely batshit insane and have another project that ends up just seeing how much power i can squeeze out of the motor. It has been known to happen!

It may take a while before i start work on the engine side of things. I want to get the bike feeling how i want before i start messing around with making it go faster!
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eternally_troubled
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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by eternally_troubled on Sat 12 Jan 2013, 11:02 am

G3o wrote:Unless i go completely insane i don't expect to see too much in the way of power gains.

Sadly I tend to agree - I don't think there is 10 (or even 6) 'easy' horsepower lurking in there - someone would have found it already :)
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G3o
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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by G3o on Mon 04 Feb 2013, 9:43 pm

eternally_troubled wrote:
G3o wrote:Unless i go completely insane i don't expect to see too much in the way of power gains.

Sadly I tend to agree - I don't think there is 10 (or even 6) 'easy' horsepower lurking in there - someone would have found it already Smile

Well it really depends what you consider "easy horsepower". If you got the crank re-aligned and balanced, the bores replated and piston matched to bring down the tolerances of the piston/bore clearance i think you might well see some considerable power gains.

Add to that a bit of port work, raised and enlarged, maybe some high rise cams and a more free flowing airbox and i think you may well see some noticable improvements. The CB was after all designed around economy and reliability, Not something that you generally combine with a high state of tune.

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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by G3o on Mon 04 Feb 2013, 10:25 pm

Bit of an update for you, I got my hands on a spare air box, had a few hours spare after work and decided to have a bit of a look see if some improvements couldn't be made. First things first i looked over what was already in place,





Small air inlet, not a problem. Basic physics dictates the size this inlet needs to be to keep up with the flow of air required be the engine, it is more than adequate and it actually a very good design. It pulls air for behind the air box flowing from the left hand side of the bike while deflecting air from the close, right hand side. This means it is pulling air in from the most calm and non-turbulent part of the bike.



Air filters a tad on the heavy side and could do with a bit of freeing up, will look into this at a later date for now its not an issue but in the near future may end up finding a bit of PVC pipe, and some low density foam may go missing from work!



Inlet tube that flows down the centre of the air filter is a point of issue. It protrudes so far into the air filter that it creates a very narrow section of space for the air to actually get into the air box. You end up with about and inch of space at the back end of the filter for air to flow through. This means the air will have to pull a 180 to fill the air box, creating vortexes and eddies. Fine for reduced intake noise, not good for air flow.



Large plastic spacer between air filter and carb inlets, again very good for sound reduction, and i'm undecided if it is beneficial or not. On one hand it may restrict the air flow up through the air box, but equally it creates two separate "calming zones" for the air to sit in. Was in two minds about it.



Everything else seemed fairly standard, so i started ripping it apart... or attempting to!

Whoever designed the thing certainly didn't want anyone getting into it! Eventually i gave up and out came the dremmel and hack saw and made light work of it.

5 minutes later i had it separated:











At this point i decided i would scrap the plastic insert purely because it was making my head hurt!

Then i attacked the inlet tube:



Then used 650 degrees of heat gun to melt the rough edges enough to pinch them together and seal the plastic again.



In these few photos:









You can see the fins that have been designed to calm the air as it flows into the box. They are positioned in such a way that they stop the air flowing directly into corners where it will form vortexes and eddies that will disrupt air flow and effectively reduce the volume of the air box... Well i find it interesting... >_<

I then put the whole thing back together and sealed it up with RTV silicone sealant. Will get some photos of the completed box when its set.

I've also been having a couple of electrical difficulties recently. Went out for a ride a few weeks ago to find that as soon as i turned my lights on the bike cut out. Not ideal by any means. I got home and checked the current across the battery and its only pushing 10.4v while the bike is running, which is about 4v less than it should be.

It could either be the reg/rec has got a phase blown, or the generator isn't functioning correctly, but the bike refused to start again so i got irritated and closed the seat... with my keys inside... my only keys... COCK!

So i spend the next hours pulling, pushing, twisting swearing and generally getting more and more frustrated until i gave up and decided it was a good excuse to butcher my seat and loose a bit a of weight!

cut round the bit of seat i didn't need because it was covered by the cowel:



pulled it back:



Got the trusty hack saw out, and went to town!



The seat lifted up enough for me to get my hand at the catch and free it, I was just irritated at this point and wanted to get it done so didn't get any more photos, but the general gist is. The seat is now at a bare minimum of what is needed and is bolted directly onto the under tray, somewhat inconvenient for underseat access but i never really use it anyway. I may even end up scrapping the whole of the undertray and storage space if i can find a new home for the battery and sort out some kind of hugger. We will see!

I also still plan on doing a proper seat design at some point so i can have a higher seating position. I'm still working on the rear sets but they are coming close to completion I will update as soon as they're ready to be made :]
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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by teamster1975 on Tue 05 Feb 2013, 9:39 am

Nice update, thanks! Cool
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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by eternally_troubled on Tue 05 Feb 2013, 12:48 pm

Airboxes are complicated things...

it will be interesting to hear if trimming that pipe has any effect (other than increasing the intake noise (which might be a good thing!))
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G3o
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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by G3o on Tue 05 Feb 2013, 3:12 pm

eternally_troubled wrote:Airboxes are complicated things...

it will be interesting to hear if trimming that pipe has any effect (other than increasing the intake noise (which might be a good thing!))

they certainly are but with a basic understanding of airflow mechanics you can generally judge what effect certain changes will have. The mistake most people make is enlarging the main inlet which will normal just cause problems unless it is particularly restrictive.
But it all depends on the bike, engine configuration and rev limit and engine sizeThe fzr 400 3en1 for example had an extremely restrictive main inlet but was also high revving. More revs on more cylinders will produce a lower pressure on the inside of the box meaning it will suck more air through a smaller gap.

I'm still in 2 minds about the plastic insert but we will see. I hope to get the bike dynod before putting it on.
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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by G3o on Mon 08 Apr 2013, 12:58 pm

Finally gotten new stator fitted, it works absolutely fine the battery was charging well... For about 5 seconds until the rectifier blow out because id been an idiot and forgot to put the earth wire back on when I refitted the reg/rec. So I have another reg/rec ordered which will hopefully be here this week.

When that's sorted I should have a fully functional bike once again and I can get back on and keep going with the project. Got the flushmount indicators fitted, just need to get an LED flasher relay.

Got the design for the rearsets donejust need to figure out a pushrod system for the rear break then I just need to get it converted to an .stl file and sent off to the 3D printers.

Looking at some wheel conversion options before I start on the drawing for an ally swingarm. Looking at a few possible options. Also planning on a 520pitch chain conversion.
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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by Stormy on Tue 09 Apr 2013, 10:51 pm

Loved reading that even though I didn't really understand much of the technical stuff!
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G3o
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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by G3o on Fri 03 May 2013, 1:00 pm

Had to put this project on a bit of a back foot recently, been hugely busy at work, the bike was off the road for 3-4 months and deteriorated surprisingly rapidly, took it in for an mot to find out what work needed doing and got a rather long list back! Front brakes were binding, front brake leverwas loose, indicators were spazzing out, rear tyre was below tread depth, position light bulb had blown rear brake didn't seem to have any pressure in it. An few other things, nothing major but all work that needed doing.

Most if it is sorted now, I've re-bled both brakes, swapped back to standard indicators for now, fitted a spring into the front brake lever to ensure it springs back fully and switches off the brake light. Re-wired a few other bits here and there as I found issues. I've got a new rear tyre come through that I will take a detour on my way to the mot centre to have fitted. Then it should be back on the road.

Work should be slowing down as we get into the summer so I can get back into this and get it closer to finished at least on the cosmetics front
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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by G3o on Thu 16 May 2013, 12:18 am

Alrighty then time for a bit of an update! Apologies in advance for the lack of photos in this part, was a bit too much going on for me to get a chance to take many.

Took the bike up to a mates house and fitted the new rear tyre, couldn't get the old tyre to release its hold on the rim with a vice/G-clamp/Hammer so got the big guns out and ran it over with a landrover ... That did the trick! New tyre seated wonderfully and the wheel didn't even need balancing, was neigh on perfect. Passed its MoT with a few advisories, nothing major and all things that will be fixed as this project continues. Only major one was stiff/notchy steering, sounds like the steering head bearing is on its way out. Will probably be replacing it at some point.

In slightly bigger news i got a new cylinder head off of Fleabay. Arrived on tuesday and I took it over to a mates and started work on it tonight.

Started by stripping it down. Checked the valve clearances before taking them out and found the reason for bike that the cylinder head was off being stripped in the first place, one of the exhaust valves had 0 clearance. Couldn't fit a gnats cock in there! So there had been gas flowing past continuously even when the valve should have been closed allowing burn to occur beyond the valve and cause an excess build up of heat. You can see that the valve has turned white. Valve on the left is the one that has seen excess heat the one of the right is normal.



Apart from that the whole thing is in very good nick, hardly any wear at all. It also looks as though it may have been upside down on a milling machine at some point and been skimmed. Will have to compare squish between the one i've got on at the moment which i know is standard and the new one. See if there is any difference.

On the valves themselves there is a lot of improvement to be made. On most of the valves there is a large lip around the 45 degree valve face. This means that flow will not be starting until the valve is considerably higher than the design should allow, so you are essentially getting less valve lift/open time. I will be getting the valves on a lathe before refitting and getting rid of the lippy bastard! Should be a couple of BHP to be got out of it. I also took the dremmel to a couple of the ports and got rid of some nasty lips and bumps. Every little helps!

So it was all stripped down, rocker cover off, cams out, valves/springs out etc. etc. and we were ready to start on the proper work!

The aim of this is to give the bike more mid range grunt. Not fussed about top speed and peak power I can mess around with gearing to get that where i want it, this is purely about power delivery. I will try and get the bike on a dyno before any performance mods get fitted and again at the end of it all but no guarantees.

The exhaust ports will be remaining exactly as they are for now, apart from the valve modification and taking a lip off around the valve seat it will remain as is.

On the inlet side we will be using chemical metal to fill the ports from the bottom then grinding it back. This will achieve two things 1) improve the shape of the port and improve flow 2) narrow the port and improve the cylinders ability to suck air/fuel through.

Apologies for the bad photos they were taken on my phone. When the job is done i will take some photos of my current head and the finished modified head with a proper camera so you can see the differences.



^^^
On the right hand side you can see the valve guide at the top and then on the bottom of the port you can see where we have filled it with chemical metal and started to grind it back down.



^^^
You can vaguely see here from the other side of the port what we are trying to achieve. This is after the chemical metal is in place but before we have started grinding it back. The bottom side of the port (top of the photo) has been raised toward the valve guide (bottom of the photo/port), we will then grind it down to a nice smooth curve.

Finally We will be fitting a flat divider horizontally across the inlet port just after the inlet rubbers. While the slide is only partially open all the air will be funneled under this spacer essentially halving the size of the inlet port and when at WoT there will be no noticeable difference at all. It will calm flow at smaller throttle openings making for a smoother ride. Its a trick used on off-roaders more than anything. But no reason it shouldn't work here too.

Think that is all for now. Hope to have this updated slightly more often from here on in :]

Ta for now
Geo


Last edited by G3o on Thu 16 May 2013, 5:22 pm; edited 1 time in total
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teamster1975
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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by teamster1975 on Thu 16 May 2013, 10:47 am

Great post, thanks Geo! I've yet to delve into the guts of the engine on the CB so this is very interesting to read!
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G3o
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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by G3o on Tue 21 May 2013, 11:27 pm

Bit more progress on this with plenty of photos :] even if they're just with my phone.

Had a good tidy up of all the ports:

Before:


After:


Before:



After:



Don't know how well you can see but apart from just being cleaner there was a casting ring round each of the ports which has now been removed, about .25mm-.5mm of material has been removed around each port.


Heres a photo of one of the inlets the LHS port is nearly done the RHS is still just at the stage of being filled in with chemical metal:



And half way through work on the RHS port:



Slightly better angle of the photo so you can see what the desired effect is. The bottom of the port wants to be flat with the outside edge of each slightly lower than the inside edge. This will funnel the fuel/air mix around the outside of the cylinder and then "crash" into each other, this allows better flow around the cylinder and let more fuel/air mix in with each stroke.

Had a bit of a tidy up of the exhaust port got over excited and ended up reworking them more than intended... couldn't resist, i had the dremmel out!



Really bad photo but.. meh

I'm still trying to find someone with the tooling to rework the hardened steel of the valves and am not having much luck! Will more than likely end up just sticking the valves in a power drill and manually reworking them with a file. Not as neat or precise but will get the job done. Tried to get some photos of the problem but it just wouldn't photograph properly so i knocked up a basic example on autocad so you can see the issue. It was faster than trying to type out an explanation :]

This is what the valves are like now in proportion just not such a sharp edge:



And this is what we want it to look like:



Ta'ra for now
Geo
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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by HomeBrew on Sat 08 Jun 2013, 1:37 am

Awesome love reading this.
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G3o
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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by G3o on Thu 13 Jun 2013, 12:16 am

Time for an update on this!

Had an off a few weeks ago, the front wheel locked up on me at 50mph causing a fairly gentle high side... well gentle in terms of high sides anyway. Bike damage was minimal, ground handlebar, broken indicators and a damaged engine cover:









Damage to me was slightly less minimal but nothing that kept me down for long! Badly grazed hip, cracked wrist, soft tissue damage to my elbow, badly bruised knee and a wrenched shoulder:



These were about 2 weeks after the accident, my entire knee was deep purple for a couple of weeks:





Still not 100% sure what caused the lock up. It was most likely a small airlock in the caliper that expanded as it heated up and then locked the front brake on. You can see here where the front pads locked onto the disk:



I will just stress, this was all while wearing FULL PROTECTIVE GEAR! AS 2pc leathers zipped in the middle, Arlen Ness Boots, AS gloves. At 50mph, had i not been wearing full gear and been going at my usual "enthusiastic" speeds I would most likely still be in hospital, or the morgue! PLEASE wear appropriate gear, it isn't worth the risk not to!

Anyway, got back home after having myself checked out and go straight onto getting the bike back on the road. Cleaned the caliper changed the banjo bolt washers and checked all the seals to be sure there were no air leaks then proceeded to re-bleed the brake, put about 1l of fluid through just to be safe. While i was working on the brake i change the nasty, rounded off front reservoir screws for some allen head bolts:





Pre-formed a couple of washers to sit in the countersink so the flat bottomed bolts could seat properly. Also decided i didn't like the front brake lever pivot bolt so dug out and old 10mm pivot shaft and threaded it:



Drilled out and tapped the front lever and master cylinder to suit:





Forgot to get fitted photos, will try and get some at some point.

Got some nice little aluminum LED indicators to fit:



Also needed to get some resistors to get them to flash properly. P=IV / R=V/I and all that guff later I had some 25w10ohm resistors on the way! Came through shortly after and I prep'd them for fitting:











Cut off the nasty cheap bullet connectors, pre-formed some spade connectors so they could fit through the m8 nut:

Top is before bottom is after:





Then got it all wired up and finished with waterproof covers:





and fitted:



Then i took a trip to wales...



















On the way back I started getting a bit of a nasty noise and grind from the final drive. On closer inspection the front sprocket was quite badly hooked, so i got a new C&S kit ordered:



Got an oversized rear sprocket that i will fit while i'm at it:

Left is oversized right is standard


standard on top of oversized


Not got any more done on the head, should be good to go soon though.

Cya next time!
Geo
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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by eternally_troubled on Thu 13 Jun 2013, 5:54 pm

Glad to hear you weren't too badly damaged.  Might have been different if you were wearing jeans...

(I can't talk - I wear jeans on my bike sometimes, but hey, do as I say, not as I do...)

Just shows why bleeding your brakes can be important, assuming that is what happened.

Wales looks like it was nice and I didn't see any rain in your photos, which seems odd :)
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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by G3o on Thu 13 Jun 2013, 6:01 pm

eternally_troubled wrote:Glad to hear you weren't too badly damaged.  Might have been different if you were wearing jeans...

(I can't talk - I wear jeans on my bike sometimes, but hey, do as I say, not as I do...)

Just shows why bleeding your brakes can be important, assuming that is what happened.

Wales looks like it was nice and I didn't see any rain in your photos, which seems odd Smile

thanks, the odd thing about it all is that the brakes had been find for 100+ miles before the lock up, so no idea what caused it to suddenly decide it was unhappy! Only thing I can think of is that a bubble of air worked its way down the line over the 100 miles previous before ending up in the caliper and being subjected to heat. But th brakes felt absolutely rock solid... Who knows, they seem fine and I've overhauled the caliper so should alkaline be good.

Wales wa bloody lovely an the on rain I saw was when I got 20 miles from home. Was scorching hot!!!
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Re: Project hooligan!

Post by G3o on Thu 27 Jun 2013, 9:55 am

When did it become so hard to get 1/2"-3/8" socket adapter... Sheared the one I had trying to undo the rear sprocket bolts and I cannot for th life of me find a shop that sells them! To ebay methinks
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Location : 'ere be fens. (near Cambridge)

Re: Project hooligan!

Post by eternally_troubled on Mon 01 Jul 2013, 5:29 pm

If this was what you were looking for:

http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_storeId_10001_catalogId_10151_productId_170741_langId_-1_categoryId_165469

then halfords looks good for it.
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G3o
Barry Sheene
Barry Sheene

Posts : 78
Location : Wiltshire

Re: Project hooligan!

Post by G3o on Tue 02 Jul 2013, 3:09 pm

eternally_troubled wrote:If this was what you were looking for:

http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_storeId_10001_catalogId_10151_productId_170741_langId_-1_categoryId_165469

then halfords looks good for it.

aye that's what I thought too but a trip to my local halfrauds came to no avail! Got one on ebay though, came through yesterday should have c&s changed this weekend

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Re: Project hooligan!

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